Letters to the Editor for Monday, Sep. 23

first_imgCategories: Letters to the Editor, OpinionSupport efforts to battle depressionWe are on a journey to find effective ways to treat depression.There are so many unturned stones and my hope is that research may provide answers and cures.In June, I was one of about 300 American Foundation for Suicide Prevention volunteers who “stormed” the hill in Washington to tell our stories so that our representatives will remember and act. The three-digit suicide hotline was one of the asks we had last year in D.C. and now that is going to be a reality, which will save lives.These changes combined with more open discussions about depression and suicide are making a difference.No longer can we view depression as a moral shortcoming that can be remediated by pulling one’s self up or snapping out of it. Depression is an illness, not unlike cancer or heart disease and it is just as deadly.We must remember that to shame those who suffer with depression is not unlike blaming someone who has cancer, we would not think of doing that and we should not think of blaming those who suffer from depression.Team Lasky has raised over $16,200 for the AFSP. I proudly support them, and you can, too. You can donate to Team Lasky at AFSP.org/Rita.Joann Perillo-LaskySchenectadyBe vigilant against terrorist ideology Regarding Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez’s (NY-D) comments about Sept. 11th that “some people did something.” This was the worst attack on American soil in history with over 3,000 dead.Please read the book “Between Heaven and Ground Zero” by Leslie Haskin, who shares the shock and pain and hell of that day.“At one point there was a woman burned to the bone,” she trembled uncontrollably as her skin melted from her body. What kind of motherless soul can so easily and savagely murder thousands and proclaim it to be in the name of righteousness?Radical Muslim terrorists, that’s who. We must never forget, and we must always be hypervigilant against this ideology.We must teach this history in schools. Osama Bin Laden in his book taught there will be a thousand years for revenge.Arlene ShakoSchoharieCDTA should use, or lose, parking spotsAll along Route 50 in Ballston Spa, there are designated bus stops for CDTA. If you park in them you will get a ticket. But CDTA buses never use them. They stand in traffic (regardless of the amount of traffic they back up).They must believe that it would take too much effort to pull back into traffic. If the CDTA does not want to use them, take them out. Or is CDTA just too special?John WhiteBallston SpaMore from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsGov. Andrew Cuomo’s press conference for Sunday, Oct. 18EDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesFoss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?EDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationlast_img read more

New hotel for Copenhagen

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How to… Take advantage of the new auction optimism

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W10 to be new W1?

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Game plan

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Lincoln: Lincoln convertible

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Strong BL condemns government

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PREMIUMOverreaction to coronavirus will bring about negative consequences: Chinese envoy

first_imgFacebook LOG INDon’t have an account? Register here Linkedin Log in with your social account Indonesia’s relationship with China looks to take another turbulent turn after the resident Chinese envoy warned Jakarta not to “overreact” in efforts to halt the spread of the deadly 2019 novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV), just shortly before officials announced a ban on livestock imports from China.Beijing has stepped up efforts to reassure countries around the world that it can control an outbreak that has spread to some two dozen countries and killed more than 420 people, amid a flurry of travel bans and other measures it may deem detrimental to the Chinese economy.Indonesia is among the few countries that may prove to be a crucial link in keeping China’s economic gears spinning, with Chinese Ambassador Xiao Qian warning on Tuesday that any overreaction would inevitably harm Indonesia’s relations with China as well as its own economy.Citing a Wor… Forgot Password ? Google Topics : Wuhan-coronavirus Wuhan-coronavirus-in-Indonesia China-Indonesialast_img read more

Chief Pancasila campaigner wants to replace ‘assalamu ‘alaikum’ as national greeting

first_img“We were already comfortable with ‘good morning’. But since reformasi, we have replaced it with ‘assalamu ‘alaikum’ in any place no matter if Christians or Hindus are [in the audience],” he said, referring to the reform movement following the downfall of president Soeharto.“Because when it reached a point where it had become extreme, the new way emerged on the use of greetings of different religions,” Yudian said, pointing at President Joko “Jokowi” Widodo’s signature greeting style.It is common practice for President Jokowi — who is Muslim — and many government officials to open their speeches with a litany of traditional religious greetings. They start with “assalamu ‘alaikum” for Muslims, “shalom” for Christians, “om swastiastu” for Hindus, “namo buddhaya” for Buddhists and “salam kebajikan” or “wei de dong tian”for Confucians.However, Yudian admitted that he personally preferred the greeting of “salam Pancasila”, which he claimed was created by Yudi Latief, an Indonesian activist and young intellectual whose writing works often raised the theme of the state ideology. Agency for Pancasila Ideology Education (BPIP) head Yudian Wahyudi has drawn public controversy after saying that “assalamu ‘alaikum” could be replaced by “salam Pancasila” as a national greeting during an exclusive interview with detik.com.The academic and rector of Sunan Kalijaga State Islamic University in Yogyakarta believed that “salam Pancasila” would be able to represent the greetings of all official religions recognized in Indonesia. Yudian’s choice was derived from his reflection on the relationship between Pancasila and religion.Read also: ‘Pancasila’s biggest enemy is religion’: Indonesia’s ideology chief’s comment sparks outcryIn the beginning of the interview, he lamented religious groups and those using religion as a political tool to further personal interests during the transition period from the New Order.Since the Reform Era, he said, political parties and mass organizations were allowed to adopt religious ideologies rather than Pancasila. From that point on, he said, the state ideology had been “annihilated” at the administrative level.“Therefore, religion is the biggest threat to Pancasila,” he said.In response to Yudian’s remarks, former forestry minister MS Kaban said the BPIP’s proposal to replace the greetings of Muslims had gone too far that the agency should be dissolved.usulan BPIP gantikan salam kaum muslimin sudah keterlaluan, satu kalimat bubarkan BPIP anti agama.Sejarah menunjukkan yg suka gugat agama khususnya islam itu jls2 PKI,Komunis anti agama.Tolak kehadiran BPIP.Ayo debat terbuka BPIP.Knpa BPIP bawa Pancasila musuh agama.— MS Kaban (@hmskaban) February 21, 2020“One sentence, disperse the anti-religion BPIP. History shows that those who don’t like religion, especially Islam, are clearly communists,” he wrote on his Twitter account @hmskaban on Friday.Jokowi appointed Yudian as BPIP head earlier this month in the hope that the BPIP could promote Pancasila values to society, particularly among the younger generation. Yudian succeeded Yudi Latif, who stepped down in June 2018 and was temporarily replaced by vice chairman Hariyono as acting chairman. (syk)Topics :last_img read more

Japanese man’s COVID-19 case raises concerns about Indonesia’s detection ability

first_imgA Japanese national has reportedly tested positive for the COVID-19 coronavirus after visiting Indonesia, raising concerns about the country’s ability to detect carriers of the deadly virus.Because of this incident, Indonesian authorities are being urged to take swift actions to prevent its spread.Bayu Krisnamurthi, who headed the National Committee for Avian Flu Control and Pandemic Preparedness between 2006 and 2010, said the Japanese man could have transmitted the virus to others in Indonesia through droplets expelled by coughs and sneezes. “The health authorities should quickly clarify this case. It should be assumed that the virus could have been contracted by someone else before the symptoms appeared,” Bayu told The Jakarta Post on Sunday.Previously, Japanese public broadcaster NHK reported that the Japanese man was in his 60s, lived in Tokyo and worked at a senior care facility.The man visited a healthcare facility in Japan on Feb. 12 after developing “cold-like symptoms” but was sent home after he was not diagnosed with pneumonia. He then worked on Feb. 13, spent Feb. 14 at home and reportedly traveled to Indonesia on a family vacation on Feb. 15.The NHK report did not specify the man’s itinerary while in Indonesia. The man returned to Japan on Feb. 19 and was soon hospitalized for having severe difficulty in breathing. He was said to be in “serious condition”.Separately, the Tokyo Novel Coronavirus Infectious Disease Control Center of the Tokyo Metropolitan government’s website confirmed that a Tokyo resident in his 60s had tested positive for the disease and that his symptoms appeared on Feb. 12.The release does not mention any travel history to Indonesia, only that the man had not been to China within the previous 14 days. The patient’s condition was listed as serious.The man was the 29th case of COVID-19 recorded in Tokyo.Meanwhile, the Indonesian Health Ministry’s disease control and environment health directorate general secretary, Achmad Yurianto, said the ministry had contacted the Indonesian Embassy (KBRI) in Tokyo to seek confirmation about the Japanese man, but his identity remained unknown.“We neither know his name nor which part of Indonesia [he visited]. So what can we investigate?” Yurianto told the Post on Sunday.Foreign Ministry acting spokesperson Teuku “Faiz” Faizasyah said that there had been no official communication with the Japanese authorities about the man.The Post tried to contact the Indonesian Embassy in Tokyo by phone on Sunday, but the line only responded with an answering machine message saying to contact the embassy during business hours.“That’s the problem: Up until now there has been no information yet from Japan,” Yurianto said.Airports across the country are using thermal scanners to detect persons who have contracted the coronavirus and are requiring international arrival passengers to provide health documents in the form of general declarations. Airlines must also provide passenger manifests to officials in the health office.However, people with no health concerns on arrival might not show detectable signs of previous exposure to the coronavirus.“We could not possibly check them all, including their phlegm,” Yurianto said.Moreover, Bayu Krisnamurthi said the authorities should have already known the proper procedures for a virus outbreak, as there had been previous cases including the avian flu, the Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) and the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS), among others.He said the authorities should at least update the public daily about the coronavirus so people can get accurate and useful information since viruses mutate.“Citizens should also be persuaded to take preventive measures: wash hands, wear masks when sick with influenza, eat well-balanced nutritious food and, if needed, take some vitamins to increase the body’s immunity,” he said.Meanwhile, Amin Soebandrio, the director of the Eijkman Institute for Molecular Biology, said that if the Japanese man showed no symptoms during his stay in Indonesia he could remain undetected despite already carrying the virus during the incubation period.The coronavirus’ incubation period is up to 14 days.“This is not just in Indonesia. [The man would be undetected] in any country if no symptoms show before he returned to Japan,” Amin told the Post.Amin said that persons infected with the virus during the incubation period could theoretically spread the virus, although they would not necessarily do so if they did not show any symptoms.“If the person already has the symptoms then he can [spread the virus],” Amin said.Amin said that the Indonesian government had followed proper procedures as according to the World Health Organization, including requiring health cards and quarantine travelers recently coming to China.“So the problem is not in our ability to detect [the coronavirus] or not because we have all the measures,” Amin said.The case is the second time a patient tested positive for COVID-19 after a visit to Indonesia.The first, a Chinese man identified as Jin, tested positive with the virus earlier this month, eight days after returning from Bali.According to the Johns Hopkins Center for Systems Science and Engineering (CSSE), as of Sunday evening (Jakarta time), there were 78,823 confirmed cases globally, most of whom were in China where the virus has killed 2,437 people.Outside of mainland China, a total 1,887 cases has been confirmed in 31 countries, including Hong Kong and Macau, resulting in 20 deaths.Japan had 135 confirmed cases with one dead, according to Johns Hopkins CSSE.A total of 23,364 people had recovered from the disease worldwide.Topics :last_img read more