Double Scotch for Sale Sharks in pre season matches

first_imgSeason Tickets have been selling well this week, and Season Ticket holders are reminded that they have the choice of which of these two pre-season games they attend, as part of their Season Ticket package.Sharks have no plans to play a pre-season match away. Sale SharksSale Sharks have announced a two-game pre-season programme for 2011-12, with  Edinburgh Rugby and Glasgow Warriors visiting Edgeley Park in August.The new-look Sharks assembled by Steve Diamond will take the field against the Celtic League outfits on successive Fridays:Friday 19th August  v. Edinburgh RugbyFriday 26th August  v. Glasgow WarriorsKick Off times have to be confirmed, but are likely to be 7.45 p.m. Sharks Executive Director of Sport Steve Diamond commented, “Both Edinburgh and Glasgow will provide good competition. It’s important, with a new squad,  that we play at home.”Both teams are seasoned European campaigners and will provide stern tests for the Sharks.  Fraser McKenzie is likely to be facing his former playing colleagues when the men from Murrayfield come to Stockport on August 19th, whilst a week later, Glasgow will be looking to avenge their pre-season 23-22 defeat at Firhill last year.  Tom Brady won that game with a try in the corner, and he was to score again on his Aviva Premiership debut against Newcastle Falcons a fortnight later.center_img LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

Canterbury to become England’s official kit partner

first_img“We believe we create the strongest kit out there – the last time our kit ripped in an international game was in 1976 – and we produce a technically advanced kit. The QBE Internationals in November will be the first presentation of the new kit, although it will be in retail from September onwards.”England have traditionally played in white, but Goldschmidt admitted today that the two parties were in discussions and any colour was possible for the new kit. What colour would you like to see England play in? LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS LONDON, ENGLAND – NOVEMBER 14: Steve Borthwick talks to Ugo Monye of England after the Investec Challenge match between England and Argentina at Twickenham on November 14, 2009 in London, England. (Photo by David Rogers/Getty Images) England played in a purple kit v Argentina in 2009Canterbury have dismissed concerns about England’s performance both on and off the field at the World Cup, and have already entered into discussions with Goldschmidt and her team at the RFU about the design of the new kit. Canterbury CEO Chris Stephenson said: “Having watched the Six Nations the team look re-energised and have presented themselves well, and we’re very excited about the future. England unveil their black kit at Twickenham in 2011THE RFU have signed a four-year deal with Canterbury, who will supply kit for England’s senior team, Saxons, Sevens, Women’s and age-grade teams from September 2012 until after the World Cup in 2015, as the official kit partner to England Rugby.England’s kit has been provided by Nike in recent years, who were the mastermind behind the controversial black kit unveiled just before last season’s World Cup in New Zealand, and although the brand were keen to continue their sponsorship a deal could not be reached. However, the RFU are delighted to have struck a deal with traditional rugby brand, and RFU Chief Commercial Officer Sophie Goldschmidt said: “The technical aspect that Canterbury put into their kit and the quality of it speaks for itself, and it’s important to have a technically advanced kit to give us an edge on the field.“Canterbury is the leading rugby brand worldwide and has been making kit for years, and that tradition is important to the RFU. This is a very significant partnership and we’re very excited about this new relationship.”Goldschmidt revealed that discussions with Nike had reached advanced stages, and added: “I would like to thank Nike who have invested a lot in us over many years. It’s a partnership that has ended amicably.”last_img read more

Championship blog: British & Irish Cup round-up

first_imgLlanelli 44, Bedford Blues 15; Rotherham 59, Connacht Eagles 3Barring a major upset at Goldington Road on Saturday and Rotherham leaving without even a losing bonus point, the Titans will progress to the quarter-finals for the first time. But with Bedford’s erratic form this season it would be premature to rule this out. Llanelli have only two wins to their credit in the competition, but have five bonus points and will fancy adding to Connacht’s Cup woes at the Sportsground on Saturday. The Eagles, who have done precious little soaring in the tournament, leaked nine tries at Clifton Lane, but Llanelli’s better points difference could see them finish ahead of the Yorkshiremen, should Bedford oblige.Six-try Albion head Pool 4Plymouth Albion 39, Stirling County 3; Munster A 30, Nottingham 15Munster A will fancy their chances of topping the group and look forward to a trip to Striling to take on the Pool’s whipping boys on Saturday. County — in common with two of the three other Scottish clubs, have yet to win a game in the competition. But if an improving Albion side can take five points from their trip to Meadow Lane, and maintain their superior points difference, Munster would be looking for a runners-up’s spot to progress.No slip-ups: Andy Robinson10-try Bristol brush Aberavon asideBrsitol 64, Aberavon 8; Gala 7, Leeds Carnegie 29Bristol should also qualify as a best runner-up even if they lose to Leeds at Headingley on Saturday. But head coach Andy Robinson’s men, who have been undone by Carnegie at home once already in the GKIPA Championship, will have no intention of slipping up. Leeds were made to work much harder than the score suggests at Netherdale on Saturday. It took three late tries to secure the bonus point and set up a terrific showdown with Bristol at Headingley. Defeat for either side wouldn’t necessarily spell disaster but Carnegie, who now head the Championship table for the first time since 2009, will want to take full bragging rights from the clash.Pirates looking good for play-off pole position. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS The Greene King IPA Championship: The competition took a break last week, for the British & Irish CupBy Richard GraingerSeven of the 12 Greene King IPA Championship starters still entertain hopes of progressing to the knock-out stages of the British & Irish Cup, going into the final round of matches this weekend.Leinster lead the way in Pool 1Leinster ‘A’ 23, Moseley 13; Cross Keys 30, Ealing Trailfinders 10Leinster’s second string — one of three unbeaten sides in the pool stages — were made to work for their berth in the quarter-finals, at Donnybrook on Friday night.Back in the day: Kevin Maggs playing for IrelandMoseley led 13-6 going into the final quarter of the match and it took three tries in 15 minutes to secure victory against head coach Kevin Maggs’ part-timers.Cross Keys upped the pace in the second period at Pandy Park and were too strong in the end for a competitive Ealing outfit, who made the early running. This means none of this weekend’s Pool 1 matches will be played for anything other than pride.All to play for in Pool 2London Welsh 26, Pontypridd 23; Edinburgh Accies 6, London Scottish 32Pool 2 is wide open as all but Edinburgh have a decent chance of making the next round, thanks to Ponty’s last minute try at the Kassam on Saturday, which yielded a losing bonus point. Winger Joe Ajuwa stood out for the Exiles, powering his way over the line on two occasions. Welsh travel to Richmond on Saturday knowing that only a bonus point win — and denying their old neighbours one — will definitely see them through.Meanwhile, Ponty entertain the Accies at Sardis Road knowing that an avalanche of points could put them through as either group winners or one of the top-placed runners up.Nine-try Titans have one foot in the quarters SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA – OCTOBER 19: Kevin Maggs of Ireland in action during the Rugby World Cup Pool A match between Ireland and Namibia at Aussie Stadium October 19, 2003 in Sydney, Australia. (Photo by Adam Pretty/Getty Images) Cornish Pirates 28, Ayr 21; Jersey 37, Ulster Ravens 19The Pirates were made to work hard to book their place in the quarter-finals in atrocious conditions at the Mennaye Field on Sunday. And if the Cornishmen can produce a bonus point win over an under-achieving Ulster second-string in Belfast on Friday night, they will be in pole position for the knockout stage. Jersey fought back from a nine-point deficit at St Peter in their first outing since head coach Harvey Biljon took control, but have no further interest in the competition.last_img read more

Get to know Canada’s DTH van der Merwe

first_imgHe’s experienced three World Cups already but the try-hungry Canadian is back for more in Japan Rewind four years and who can forget that thrilling try by Canada against Italy at Elland Road? Not DTH van der Merwe, that’s for sure, who rates it as his favourite Rugby World Cup moment.Canada had spoken in the week about the narrowness of Italy’s defence and, 14 minutes in, van der Merwe called it: Tyler Ardron caught a restart in his 22, fed his wing on the left flank, and van der Merwe went on a searing run to the distant try-line, exchanging passes with Ciaran Hearn along the way.Van der Merwe scored in every pool game that year, four of the 37 tries in 
56 Tests that bear testimony to his greatness in Canucks red. Canada’s record try-scorer, he’s set to break the country’s RWC appearance record in Japan, overtaking the mark of 14 held 
by Jamie Cudmore and Rod Snow (he will match this record against New Zealand).Gruff Rees, the Canada backs coach on secondment from Cardiff Blues, has got to appreciate the player’s attributes from close up over the past year.“I’d always admired DTH as a player, coached against him many times and saw how he could influence games with his physical ability and game understanding,” he says. “But having worked with him he’s even better than I’d thought. Which is a big statement.Evasive: Against Hong Kong during World Cup qualifying (Getty Images)“He knows where and how to impact a game, and he’s a real student of it as well; he asks good questions, challenges in the right way, and understands the back-line principles we work to. He’s a guiding light in terms of where and why we do things.”Van der Merwe was 21 when he made his RWC debut, against Wales in Nantes, and recalls acting as a speed bump for Lote Tuqiri in that same 2007 event. He played full-back that day in Bordeaux, at centre throughout RWC 2011, and should be in his usual No 11 shirt when he steps out for a fourth World Cup in September.I catch him one Sunday ahead of the Pacific Nations Cup. How does the 2007 you compare to the 33-year-old of today?“I’ve definitely evolved. I’ve gained 
15 kilos!” he says. “In my first World Cup 
I was a naïve firecracker 
and experienced guys like Morgan Williams and Mike James kept a cap on it. Celebrating in style: Scoring against Italy in 2015 (Getty images) “I was always confident about running the ball and didn’t really think about my kicking game; now, I can switch to a territory game and maybe more ball play.“In 2007 I was stuck on the wing quite a bit trying to make my tackles and catch the ball if it came my way. I’m more of a leader now and have more input in the daily grind of training and going into matches. But I’m still just a guy who enjoys his rugby.”Fiery rivalry: After scoring against the USA (Getty Images)He’s not one to toe the line if he sees injustice. In 2015 Canada led Romania 15-0 but tired against their fresher opponents and lost. Van der Merwe complained about the scheduling then and he’s complaining now as Canada prepare to face Italy, New Zealand, South Africa and Namibia in quick succession.“We’ve got four games in 17 days, the second-worst schedule in the whole World Cup. It’s unfair. Tier Two nations should get a better schedule than Tier One. There’s a massive difference in player depth and I hope one day the World Cup will take that into account.”The flip side is Major League Rugby, now providing a precious pro platform in North America. “There’s a change showing in our rugby. With Toronto Arrows, we’ve got 30 or 35 players with Canadian badges on playing at a higher level; the Seawolves have about eight players, we’ve guys at NOLA Gold. We’ve guys all over the MLR, it’s huge for us.”Having reached Japan via the back door of the repêchage, are Canada heading for a fall? “No, the feeling in the squad is really positive. We’ve got a lot of youngsters who bring that bit of edge and confidence, but also older guys with World Cup experience who calm those nerves down when it comes to game time. We’re in a good place.”This first appeared in the October 2019 edition of Rugby World magazine. center_img LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Remember to follow Rugby World on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram.last_img read more

Hotshot: Red Roses flanker Amelia Harper

first_imgThe Loughborough Lightning only started playing six years ago but is already part of the England set-up All systems go: Amelia Harper during England training (Getty Images) LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS I started on the wing, then centre, so I’ve worked my way in. I’m now in the back row and think it’s the best position – you’re a forward but you don’t have to put your head in tight places!I want to keep improving – my work over the ball, my rucking, my jackling.Who’s been the biggest influence on your career? My parents. I wouldn’t have been able to do half the stuff I’ve done without them. They drove me everywhere and have helped me financially. They’re really supportive and encourage me. I want to give back to them as much as possible.Who were your childhood heroes? My first one was Jessica Ennis – I remember watching her at the Olympics.Maggie Alphonsi was my second one. I watched the 2014 World Cup and she was a cool player.RW VERDICT: A regular off the England bench in the Six Nations, this teen has been described by Simon Middleton as “fast across the ground and fearless in contact. She’s an out-and-out seven”. Expect to see her get a start later this year.center_img Red Roses flanker Amelia Harper Date of birth 17 July 2000 Born Pembury, Kent Position Flanker Club Loughborough Country EnglandWhen did you first get involved in rugby? I was 14 – it was quite late. My friend played for the girls’ side at Edenbridge and said, “You should come along. I think you’ll like it.” I liked it straightaway – running around with my friends and being allowed to be aggressive.Talk through your progress… I played there for a while but then we didn’t have enough numbers, so I moved to Aylesford and played there. I did county U18s and made the decision at 16 to go to college in Loughborough to join the AASE programme. I was interested in sport and I just wanted to improve.Lightning was just across the road so I joined them at 17 and I’m now at uni there doing sports science.How hard was it to move away from home at 16? It was a challenge at times but very rewarding. I like a challenge. It was the opportunity to get physically and mentally better with training. I missed home and was far away from my parents, but it made me a better person.What positions have you played? This article originally appeared in the May 2020 edition of Rugby World magazine. Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.last_img read more

Who is Courtney Lawes: Ten things you should know about the England lock

first_imgGet the lowdown on the hard-tackling lynchpin of England’s forward pack 3. His dad, Linford, is from Jamaica. With a background in football and cricket, Courtney remembers Linford saying that rugby was a bit rough for kids.4. After coming through the Northampton Saints Academy, he made his club debut in 2007 against Esher in the Championship – then known as National League One. He’s won the Challenge Cup, LV= Cup and Premiership with Saints.Courtney Lawes on his debut against Australia in 2009 (Getty Images)5. An England debut came in the autumn of 2009. Australia triumphed 18-9 at Twickenham thanks to tries from Will Genia and Adam Ashley-Cooper. Courtney Lawes in England training during the 2021 Six Nations (Getty Images) 8. He is undefeated as a Test Lion, playing in the second-Test win and third-Test draw against New Zealand in 2017.9. At 6ft 7in and 18st, he is the joint-tallest player in the British & Irish Lions squad, alongside Exeter second-row Jonny Hill.10. Lawes and wife Jessica have four children – Nell, Teddy, and twin boys Otto and Hugo. Who is Courtney Lawes: Ten things you should know about the England lockCourtney Lawes has been an international tour de force for more than a decade. The epitome of the modern lock/blindside hybrid, he is best known for his shuddering physicality and devotion to club side Northampton Saints.Here are ten more facts about the England forward.Ten things you should know about Courtney Lawes1. Courtney Lawes was born on 23 February 1989 in Hackney, London, but grew up in the Northampton area.2. Lawes began to play rugby when he was 13 at Northampton School for Boys, the same school which produced ex-England hooker Steve Thompson. His club side was Northampton Old Scouts.center_img 6. He has featured for England in ten successive Six Nations campaigns.7. Lawes didn’t receive an email checking his availability for the British & Irish Lions 2021 tour because it was sent to an old email address. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.last_img read more

Exploring collaborative ministries

first_img Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC By Greg SylerPosted Feb 2, 2012 Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET [Episcopal News Service] I’m excited to be part of a process in the Diocese of Washington focusing on collaboration, looking at Region 6 in our diocese. Locals call the region southern Maryland – 22 parishes in the old tobacco economy of lower Prince George’s, Charles, and St. Mary’s Counties.  All but two of the congregations have graveyards, and many date back to the earliest days of the nation.  But tobacco is no longer a cash crop so farms are snatched up by developers and new homes are quickly built, making it the fastest growing region in the state.  But the churches are losing ground. Average Sunday attendance is 75, and it’s an aging membership.  Southern Maryland is a snapshot of the Episcopal Church in America today.Four years ago, our region started a conversation with our diocese. The point was simple: we need to change the way we do church, or else there won’t be any church left. As smart as we were to see this, we were naïve to think that naming the elephant actually gets it out of the room. Neither the diocese nor the congregations were willing to change the institutional structure, nor was either imaginative or inspired enough by the Holy Spirit to do so.Over time, the idea of collaboration emerged.  “We need to act as one Episcopal Church,” went the rallying cry of a well-attended event one year ago.  And so was born the Collaborative Ministries Exploration Group or CMEG, a voluntary coalition of 25 lay and clergy leaders.The diocese picked up the tab for catering and a consultant, and my co-chair and I determined that CMEG would eat, pray and share our individual stories, then get to work on the nuts-and-bolts of collaboration: research strategies of collaboration and present what we learned.  A great idea.A funny thing happened along the way. We enjoyed praying and sharing our stories, but we barely accomplished half of what we set out to do.  We have done something important, though. We’ve built a new community of people, inspired by the Holy Spirit to imagine what the Body of Christ can be.In so doing, we’ve also realized that collaboration is not enough. At its core, the question of sustainability for the Episcopal Church (and not just in southern Maryland) is really about how God is transforming the residues of conventional Christianity into a robust, mission-minded fellowship who gathers in the name of His Son, Jesus. Without a new community and new vision, collaboration doesn’t sufficiently challenge the (ironically) congregational nature of the way many of us think.It’s easy to say we need to act like one Episcopal Church. It’s a lot harder to do; changing policy is too big and boring.  We can, however, change the way the People of God do church, then expect the institution to change.  Our goal is no longer collaboration but, rather, collaborative ministries.  We’re setting out to develop the discipleship capacity of our membership, and if we want to do impactful work we’ve got to work together with other congregations, creating ministries that do not yet exist or broadening ministries that someone is doing but not with maximum impact.The Episcopal Church’s institutional structure is changing, no matter what, so it seems wise our diocesan leadership is willing to run with the structural changes that will necessarily emerge when the people of God start being church together in new and different ways. It will require new disciplines – it’s probably easier, still, for a diocese to communicate with one parish than with one region – and we’ll undoubtedly have to learn new things.This is where we are as one region in one diocese and, I’d suspect, as the Episcopal Church today.  It’s about collaboration, after all, so we’d like to open the conversation and share our early discoveries:1.    You’ve got to have this conversation regularly, even though it may look to some like you’re not doing anything.2.    Collaboration in ministry is a good idea, regardless of church size.  If you invite people into the conversation, many of them will come to realize this on their own.3.    Collaborative ministry is not the only strategy.  We still need healthy and happy parish churches to provide weekly sustenance.  Not everyone will think collaborative ministry is a great idea, nor should they.4.    Collaborative ministry challenges the singular dominance of the one-parish/one-priest model.  There are other ways of organizing, and people (including dioceses) will come to realize that.5.    Many church-folks are ready to do meaningful ministry.  Equally, they’re tired of talking about decline.  More focus on loss won’t move anyone anywhere.6.    There are smart practitioners in the field of congregational development but what works in one situation won’t necessarily translate everywhere.7.    A lot of our best attempts seek to stem the loss of membership, instead of grow the Church.8.    The challenge of our time is to coordinate collaborative efforts on a large-scale.  This work is often done in limited contexts and, generally, with churches already in decline.  We actually have the human resources now, sitting in our pews.— The Rev. Greg Syler is rector of St. George’s in Valley Lee, Maryland, co-chairs the Collaborative Ministries Exploration Group of Region 6 of the Diocese of Washington and is working with others to create a diocesan summer camp. Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY February 2, 2012 at 6:28 pm What resonates for me is the following point made in this article: “Collaborative ministry is not the only strategy. We still need healthy and happy parish churches to provide weekly sustenance. Not everyone will think collaborative ministry is a great idea, nor should they.” As a 20-year member of an Episcopal parish in Washington, D.C., I would add that even if one thinks that collaborating on one or two big mission projects is a good idea, one still wants and needs a very healthy parish — that is, a Christian family or community — which attracts because it evinces God’s love operating within it, among its members. There are a zillion nonprofits doing social and economic justice missions. One joins and supports a church, I think, to be “fed”, as in “Feed my sheep.” If that is not occurring at the Parish level, a collaborative mission overarching numerous parishes will, I fear, not prevent the church from dwindling. Featured Events TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Bob Partlow says: Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Press Release Service Kurt H. Jacobs says: Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Featured Jobs & Calls Comments are closed. The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Bath, NC Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Submit a Press Release Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Exploring collaborative ministries Comments (3) Rector Albany, NY Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Shreveport, LA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Smithfield, NC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA center_img Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Washington, DC Director of Music Morristown, NJ Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Pittsburgh, PA Submit an Event Listing Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA February 3, 2012 at 10:16 am I think collaboration has great merit under many circumstances. I do have to wonder why the fastest growing area of a state needs that strategy for parishes survival? “Southside” Virginia which has had long term broad economic and population decline is waking up to collaboration as part of a survival strategy. But of greater importance, I believe, is the urgent need to equip and empower greater ministry by all the baptized. The church needs this in all locations and situations. Emerging generations want to effectively participate in their religious practices. New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Belleville, IL Peggy Goldsmith says: Rector Collierville, TN Rector Martinsville, VA February 2, 2012 at 10:33 pm I go to St Paul’s Piney. Did your group discuss the challenges of the physical distances between the parishes in Region 6? Piney hosts a luncheon twice a year for parishioners in the Region who are 50 or older. We have some churches tell us it’s just too far to come. Our next one is scheduled for 5/8 and I’ve been told Bishop Mariann will be coming. In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Associate Rector Columbus, GA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Tampa, FL Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Knoxville, TN An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Submit a Job Listing Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Youth Minister Lorton, VAlast_img read more

TEXAS: Two local clergy to stand for bishop suffragan election

first_img Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Submit an Event Listing Rector Bath, NC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Press Release Service Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Smithfield, NC Posted Apr 5, 2012 Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Featured Events Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Submit a Job Listing Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Tampa, FL [Episcopal Diocese of Texas] Two nominations for bishop suffragan for the eastern region of the Episcopal Diocese of Texas were announced on April. 2, following the Standing Committee’s preliminary background checks. The Rev. Beth J. Fain, rector of St. Mary’s, Cypress, and the Rev. Jeff W. Fisher, rector of St. Alban’s, Waco, will stand for election on June 2 at Christ Church Cathedral in Houston. Both will participate in a diocesan-wide “walkabout” event at Camp Allen on May 12, open to all interested persons, beginning at 10 a.m.Click here to read the candidates biosThe diocese held a completely open nomination process, explained Pam Nolting, chair of the committee overseeing the nominations and election.  “We have made our process known throughout the country and have invited anyone who feels called to this ministry to enter that election process,” Nolting said.Texas Bishop C. Andrew Doyle announced his intention to call for the election at the Clergy Conference in October 2011. At the time he invited clergy (along with their lay leaders) to begin thinking of good candidates and laid out his specific expectations for the bishop suffragan’s position as a regional bishop (headquartered in Tyler).A bishop suffragan serves under the leadership of the bishop diocesan, who frames his or her specific work. Among the duties of the new bishop will be the boards of St. James’ House, the diocesan retirement community in Baytown; All Saints’ School, Tyler; William Temple Center, Galveston and St. Vincent’s House, Galveston. The new bishop also will be responsible for pastoral care of the clergy and be the diocesan liaison to the Little Church Club, Episcopal Church Women, diocesan Altar Guild, Cursillo, Recovery Ministry, Brotherhood of St. Andrews, Faith Alive, Restorative Justice and have oversight of the Bishop Quin Sabbatical Grants.“Over the last six months clergy from across the diocese have been in conversation with their peers and lay leaders to discern their call to this particular ministry,” Doyle said. “I know that we have had at least nine serious candidates who, in the end, decided this was not a ministry they felt called to undertake.”Some decided the position was not a ministry they felt called to undertake, whether there was a stronger call to remain in their current position or a decision based on the travel and time away from family that the ministry requires, he explained.Fain was nominated by the Rev. James Derkits, priest missioner (St. Mark’s Between-the-Bayous, Houston), Cindy Angle (St. Mary’s, Cypress) and the Rev. Uriel Osnaya-Jimenez, vicar, (Santa Maria Virgen, Houston). Fisher was nominated by the Rev. Wanda Cuniff, deacon (Christ Church, Nacogdoches); Trey Yarbrough III (Christ Church, Tyler) and Clint Capers, (St. Alban’s, Waco). Elected delegates from each congregation and clergy will vote during the election. A nominee must have a majority from each order (clergy and laity) on the same ballot in order to be elected.The nominees bios and responses to a series of questions along with updated information on the election are on the diocesan website. Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Featured Jobs & Calls Associate Rector Columbus, GA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Martinsville, VA Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Washington, DC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Bishop Elections, The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Youth Minister Lorton, VA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Tags Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Shreveport, LA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Albany, NY Rector Knoxville, TN In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 House of Bishops Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Belleville, IL Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Collierville, TN An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit a Press Release TEXAS: Two local clergy to stand for bishop suffragan election Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET last_img read more

Presiding Bishop to visit South Carolina diocese

first_img Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs December 10, 2012 at 4:33 pm Bishop Katharine, my prayers are with you and the people of South Carolina. May the peace and hope of God be with all of you. December 12, 2012 at 1:47 am Dear Bryan, quick question just for clarification…of what province of the Anglican Communion is ‘The Episcopal Diocese of South Carolina’ a diocese, as you understand it? Tags Presiding Bishop to visit South Carolina diocese Special convention in January will elect provisional bishop Randolph Charles says: Bryan Hunter says: December 11, 2012 at 10:53 am This article is chock-full of factual errors. Despite what TEC “fact” sheet says, there is absolutely nothing in the constitution or canons of TEC that disallows a diocese to leave TEC.Secondly, Bishop Lawrence has stated repeatedly that those parishes which choose to leave the Diocese of South Carolina and realign with TEC are free to do so and go with his blessing and well-wishes in order to re-form as they see fit. Whether they (or TEC) choose to follow TEC canons for creating a new diocese is no longer his concern. However, what these parishes are not allowed to do is to arrogate the identity of The Diocese of South Carolina (including its name, its diocesan seal, and its history). The Diocese of South Carolina (and its seal) are organized and registered under the corporate law of the State of South Carolina. The diocese is a legal entity with Bishop Lawrence and the Standing Committee registered as the leadership.Furthermore, this article suggests that the provisional bishop for this new diocese will replace the Rt Rev Mark Lawrence. Not so. Mark Lawrence remains the duly elected and installed bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of South Carolina, an ecclesiastical and corporate entity that still persists during its 227 years of uninterrupted existence.Whatever new name the nascent TEC diocese in the Lowcountry of South Carolina chooses for itself, I pray God’s guidance and blessing upon it and the many friends I count within it as they choose their first bishop. Comments are closed. The Rev. Dr. W. Robert Abstein says: Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Ronald J. Caldwell says: Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ December 10, 2012 at 8:51 am This is great news for the Episcopalians of the low country. The slow train wreck in South Carolina has been happening for years if not decades so none of the recent actions of the old diocesan leadership is a surprise. The local Episcopalians and the national church had a pretty good idea and so were prepared. As soon as the diocesan leadership invoked the hitherto secret agreement of the standing committee to break from TEC if TEC took any action against the bishop, an Episcopalian steering committee was formed. Soon after the meeting on November 17 documented the diocese’s withdrawal from TEC, the Presiding Bishop accepted the renunciation of Episcopal Church orders by Bishop Lawrence. As soon as Lawrence was removed as bishop, the steering committee made a plan for a prompt diocesan convention to elect a new provisional bishop and standing committee. All of this decisive action has lifted the hearts of the faithful Episcopalians in lower Carolina. Now that the two groups have completely divided, the Episcopal Church can get on with the business of rebuilding a great diocese. Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Knoxville, TN Thomas Wortham says: Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Youth Minister Lorton, VA December 10, 2012 at 6:35 pm As a part-time resident of Pawleys Island, I am grateful for the continuing diocese plan. My prayers are with you all at this time. God bless you as you reorganize a wonderful diocese. December 28, 2012 at 5:10 pm Thank You! Our worship groups are growing in number and we have been gathering delegates for the convention in January as we personally endure continued condemnation from our former fellow parishioners and Rector. At least we found out who are real friends are! December 10, 2012 at 10:53 pm Amen and blessings on all those who fail to see Christ at work in this process. tom Rebecca Alford says: Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit a Job Listing This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI December 10, 2012 at 5:45 pm As a retired priest, and a product of the Diocese of South Carolina (though I never served there) I, like so many, am grieved by the divisions within the Diocese. Yes, the divisions have been present, in one form or another, for decades — but it is now a time when the Diocese of South Carolina will begin to grow, anew, into representatives of Jesus, and serve the People of God, instead of themselves. How I wish I was closer so I could, somehow, be of assistance. Blessings to all from Riviera Beach, Florida December 17, 2012 at 6:27 am As a member of the Diocese of Quincy, I understand the pain that the Episcopalians are feeling. We are still recovering from the stealing of our churches under the leadership of Keith Ackerman. The people of the Diocese of Quincy are dedicated to the tradition of The Episcopal Church.Three years ago we went through what you are going through at this time. I was one of the people that was on the committee that worked to reconstitute The Diocese of Quincy. The Presiding Bishop was with us every step of the way. Don’t be dismayed over what the people that have left TEC are saying about The Episcopal Church. These people have an agenda that was started a long time ago. They feel that they are correct in whatever they say or do. They have been mislead and lied to for years, and at this time, there is nothing that you can say that will change their mind.In the Diocese of Quincy, the people where told that The Episcopal Church was evil and no longer Christian. I can site many statements that were made that will show you to what lengths they will go through to prove their point. The TRUTH never came from THEIR MOUTH. After a while, if you did not not do your own investigation, you would believe those lies.The Diocese of South Carolina will do just fine. During The Diocese of Quincy reconstitution, I was one of seven people that worked with The Presiding Bishop and her Staff. They offered us all the support and assistance that we needed.I like to tell this story to show the heart of The Presiding Bishop and Clay Matthews.My brother died in Virginia. The first day I was there, I received a call from Clay Matthews with condolences. He was calling to also tell me that he had contacted the Bishop of the Southern Diocese of Virginia to contact me. He wanted to make sure that I had pastoral care. A few hours later I talked to the Bishop and the Priest of the The Episcopal Church in Newport News, VA.. To this day, I have no idea how The Presiding Bishop or Clay Matthews were made aware of my brothers death. I cannot tell you how great it was to have this kind of support.I will be with you, as you reconstitute the Diocese of South Carolina on January 25 and 26, 2013May the Peace and Love of The Lord, be with you Always! Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Maggie McGill says: Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 December 10, 2012 at 4:34 pm As a former priest of the diocese, I have been saddened to read of the painful divisions in the diocese of SC. I am heartened and encouraged to read of the arrangements by leaders of the continuing diocese and by the presiding bishop. I suppose it has been no surprise to most, given that all this has taken place in the State that is at odds much of the time with much of the nation. But now I pray that the continuing diocese will be empowered by God’s Holy Spirit with a great sense of community as you all move forward with your work and ministries. Rector Albany, NY Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori, December 10, 2012 at 4:19 pm My prayers will be with the Diocese of South Carolina as they choose new leadership for the good people there. Hopefully hearts will be heal in the process and the diocese can move forward in the work that is set before them. It may be a long and painful road, but I pray that all will be well and your good work will continue. An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Featured Events William A. Kolb says: John Andrews says: Rector Washington, DC South Carolina Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Joel Rowse says: Ronald R Peak says: Associate Rector Columbus, GA tom van alen says: Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Submit an Event Listing December 10, 2012 at 11:42 pm As az Priest ordained in Holy Comforter, Sumter, 40 years ago, I havbe been sad over the events in the Diocese of SC. You have been, and will continue to be in my prayers as you reorganize and begin to bring a renewed spirit into the diocese. God Bless you all as events unfold. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS December 12, 2012 at 4:17 pm Please don’t confuse the continuing Diocese of South Carolina, and those who claim to be the Diocese of South Carolina (aka the Diocese of Lawerance) with the Diocese of Upper South Carolina, Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Collierville, TN Featured Jobs & Calls The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group The Rev Bob Spencer, BCC says: December 10, 2012 at 9:23 am My prayers (which trust in a loving and inclusive God) are with you as you gather to continue the work of the Gospel. Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Tampa, FL Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Comments (16) Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Belleville, IL Paul Foster says: Jay Abbott says: Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Bath, NC Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY January 6, 2013 at 4:23 pm It is sad to see the conservatives of the Anglican Communion so willing to abandon its traditional polity. Regardless of what they think of the currect TEC practice, our province of the Anglican Communion works from the bottom up. I believe we have to embrace the belief that the Holy Spirit will not allow the church to be led permanently into error. The time is not yet for unequivocal categorical condemnations.Just a minor correction, Bishop Kenneth Price was from the Diocese of Southern Ohio. Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC [Episcopal News Service] Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori is scheduled to join continuing Episcopalians in the Diocese of South Carolina Jan. 25-26 as they choose a provisional bishop.“We welcome the opportunity to have her with us at this important time in the history of our diocese, and it will be a privilege to share with her firsthand the energy and diversity of the Episcopal Church in the Diocese of South Carolina,” said Hillery Douglas, chairman of the steering committee for the reorganization of the diocese and senior warden of St. Mark’s Episcopal Church in Charleston, in a press release posted here.There will be a reception and other events involving Jefferts Schori on Jan. 25, according to the release, and she will then preside over the convention the next day at Grace Episcopal Church in Charleston as delegates elect a provisional bishop and choose people to fill other vacant diocesan offices.A nominating committee of diocesan Episcopalians is working with the presiding bishop to discern a bishop to nominate for the provisional position, the release said.Bishop John Clark Buchanan, who lives in Mount Pleasant, South Carolina, and Bishop Charles vonRosenberg of Daniel Island, both retired Episcopal Church bishops, are listed here as advisers to the steering committee.A provisional bishop has all the authority and responsibilities of a diocesan bishop, but typically serves for a set period of time and is meant to be a bridge into the time when the continuing diocese is ready to elect a diocesan bishop or make other decisions about its future.For instance, the Diocese of Quincy, which elected Buchanan to serve provisionally, is actively discerning possible reunification with the adjacent Diocese of Chicago. And in Pittsburgh, continuing Episcopalians recently ordained and consecrated Bishop Dorsey W. M. McConnell to be the diocese’s eighth bishop. Bishop Kenneth Price, from the neighboring Diocese of Southern Ohio, served as provision bishop of Pittsburgh for three years.Fort Worth and San Joaquin have elected more than one provisional bishop over time. Bishop Rayford High is the Diocese of Fort Worth’s third provisional bishop, following Bishop C. Wallis Ohl and Bishop Edwin “Ted” Gullick. And Bishop Chet Talton is the Diocese of San Joaquin’s second provisional bishop, succeeding Bishop Jerry Lamb.Some of the continuing dioceses also had the assistance of bishops who served in consulting or assisting roles until they were able to convene to elect a provisional bishop.The continuing Diocese of South Carolina needs a new episcopal leader because Jefferts Schori said Dec. 5 that Mark Lawrence had renounced his orders. She and her Council of Advice agreed that in a  Nov. 17 speech to a special diocesan convention, Lawrence said the diocese had left the Episcopal Church a month earlier when Jefferts Schori restricted his ministry on Oct. 17 after the church’s Disciplinary Board for Bishops had certified to her that he had abandoned the Episcopal Church “by an open renunciation of the discipline of the church.”When the day the board’s decision was announced, the diocesan Standing Committee said that the action “triggered two pre-existing corporate resolutions of the diocese, which simultaneously disaffiliated the diocese from the Episcopal Church and called a special convention.”Lawrence asked for and received affirmation from those at the Nov. 17 gathering of that departure.Lawrence and those he leads continue to say that he is still the bishop of the Diocese of South CarolinaAccording to a fact sheet posted on the Episcopal Church’s website: “Dioceses cannot leave the Episcopal Church. While some clergy and individuals may choose to leave, congregations and property remain in the diocese to be used for the mission of the Episcopal Church.”– The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service. Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Dec 10, 2012 December 11, 2012 at 7:28 pm The Trouble is when the Episcopal Church’s leadership at the national level are no longer holding to the traditions of the Church, and then normal bread and butter Christians in the Episcopal Church no longer have natural or organic fellowship or unity. The Roman Catholic Church has included them in a special generous offer, and the majority of Anglicans in the world would welcome them, just not the North American Anglicans who are in communion with Canterbury. My prayers are with Bishop Mark Lawrence and the Christians he shepherds, he is put in a very hard position by a denomination that is now very hard to reconcile with traditional Christianity; Catholic, Protestant or Orthodoxy. The exodus from the Episcopal Church by ordinary Christians must indicate something is not right. Press Release Service Lin Goldstone says: Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Shreveport, LA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Submit a Press Releaselast_img read more

RIP: Bert Medley, broadcast journalist, digital innovator, succumbs to cancer

first_img Tags Featured Events AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis March 20, 2014 at 3:00 pm An appropriate tribute to a gracious and respected colleague. Curate Diocese of Nebraska Obituary, Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Comments (7) Rector Washington, DC Submit a Job Listing Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem March 13, 2014 at 8:31 pm Thank you for a moving tribute to a man who could prove that nice people can finish first. As I remarked earlier, Bert and I met, and became friends and confidente’s in the late 60s, lost contact a few years later, and resumed contact (by fortunate accident) two years ago. At the outset of our friendship we both came to know that skin color had nothing to do with friendship, professional and personal. A third colleage, Donn Doak, shared that feeling. Bert’s legacy will be imprinted on TV’s book of accomplishments with a bright star. March 18, 2014 at 10:33 am I am the aforementioned college roomate who was Bert’s girlfriend. I am happy to say that I did keep in touch with him for most of the past 45 years. Jane put it so eloquently — visionary and global soul. And kind, gentle and loving.No one who has ever met Bert does not love him and cherish the friendship. I was so fortunate to explore that beautiful soul to its extreme depths. I will love him always and miss him dearly.Bon voyage, dear friend. Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Shreveport, LA Del Glover says: Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS March 19, 2014 at 3:48 pm I knew Bertram as a child as we grew up together in his home church and faith in Philadelphia PA. I was very sorry to hear of his death, but very proud of his accomplishments in life. May he now rest in peace until Jesus comes.An erstwhile friend. Jane grissmer says: Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Tampa, FL Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 RIP: Bert Medley, broadcast journalist, digital innovator, succumbs to cancer Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Featured Jobs & Calls Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT People Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET March 12, 2014 at 12:37 pm Alessandra and company – Thank you for this beautifully written tribute to a beautiful person. Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ By Alessandra Pena, Allison Davis and Dan WebsterPosted Mar 12, 2014 The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Comments are closed. Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Martinsville, VA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Bath, NC Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA L. Leonita Ashley Herrington says: March 13, 2014 at 9:53 pm I met Bert in the early 70’s in dc. He dated my college roommate . We were all white girls. He surely noted that but always went beyond that. A true visionary and global soul to the end. Reading his obituary and the further expression of his soul in the world, I am only sad that I lost touch with him. He lived fully and beautifully. Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Bertram Albert Medley, Jr., age 69, passed away peacefully at Calvary Hospital in N.Y. Tuesday night (March 11) after a long and courageous battle with cancer. Born on July 21, 1944 in Philadelphia to a family of devout Seventh-day Adventists, he attended an integrated public high school where he discovered two traits in himself that would shape his life both personally and professionally.Firstly, he learned that he was able instinctively to seek out the human commonalities he shared with others, beyond any racial or religious differences. While this would later inform his journalistic talent for getting to the true “heart” of a news story; more importantly and poignantly, his life-long open minded/big-hearted inclusiveness allowed him to be surrounded in his final months by cherished pastors who were Episcopal priests and Jewish rabbis, by beloved African-American family members and Swedish American “nephews,” and a support team of devoted “framily,” who rivaled any U.N. gathering in their diversity. Skypes from Israel and South Africa were as common to his hospital bed as were the stream of visitors from around the country that brought such comfort to him and amazement to hospital staff. His hospice physician at Calvary, Dr. Carrington commented that “in my entire career, I have rarely seen such an outpouring of love and support for a patient.”His second discovery at Olney High School, Philadelphia, was the fascination of evolving broadcast technology. This would lead to Bert’s illustrious 33-year career with NBC, first as a network news producer and later as a pioneering visionary who helped lay the groundwork for the digital media age at MSNBC.Bert caught the broadcast bug after a white, fellow Adventist and classmate invited him to his suburban home to show him the low power radio station he’d set up in his basement. Bert was hooked and the rest was history. From there, he honed his skills working at the college radio station at his alma mater, Temple University. In 1968, he got his first professional television post with NBC News in Atlanta. He later worked in bureaus in Cleveland, Washington, D.C. and Tel Aviv, Israel (where he served as Deputy Bureau Chief from 1985-88), before finally landing at network headquarters in New York City.His innate compassion and keen story telling skills came to the fore when he teamed up with correspondent Bob Dotson to produce pieces were for a Today Show segment called “…in Pursuit of the American Dream,” which ran from 1975 to 1984. Dotson recalls the story that had the biggest impact on Bert “was the one we did on a Philadelphia beat cop, Bill Sample, who granted wishes to sick kids. In a nutshell the cop’s neighborhood effort paved the way for ‘Make a Wish’ and all the other big time charities that followed.  Bert found the story in his hometown and the piece was nominated for an Emmy.”Bert Medley was also a futurist. He invested in a computer long before it was a household staple, realizing that this device sitting on top of a desk could engage the “viewer” with words, pictures and sound and that this rich multi-media experience – controlled and guided by the user – could have a much greater impact on presenting news content than the passivity of the television screen.In 1995 he jumped at the chance to be an integral part of the first teams at NBC News working to bring original news content to the internet. Even before MSNBC.com, there was “NBC Supernet” and it was Bert’s vision that helped lead a small band of digital news pioneers to this new age of journalism.“Bert was instrumental in bringing his television broadcast colleagues to this new frontier,” said Allison Davis, former NBC News colleague. “Few understood this digital realm but Bert led them by the hand, teaching them to ‘think differently.’”In 1995 there was no book or script. There was no model to follow.  NBC was the first broadcaster to go online and arguably the first news organization to produce original journalism on the internet.“We made it up as we went along,” Davis said. “Bert created content and sweet talked his way into using the servers of the parent company, General Electric, that provided the hosting, storage and distribution of our original NBC News content.”Every Friday, Bert worked late to build an online page that chronicled the week’s news. There was even a news quiz with a T-shirt prize for the user who was first to answer the questions correctly. It wasn’t long before NBC Supernet was absorbed by the partnership between NBC News and Microsoft. Bert was tapped to help direct news coverage at MSNBC.com; his last position at NBC News but certainly not his last job in the digital world.His work at NBC was recognized with awards from The Associated Press, Women in Communications, the Catholic Academy and the Epilepsy Foundation of America. During his broadcast and cable career he had been active in several professional organizations including NATPE- National Association of Television Program Executives,SIIA – Software & Information Industry Association, NABJ – National Association of Black Journalists, and BAFTA – British Academy of Film and Television Arts New York.In early 2001, he took early retirement from NBC but his communications career was far from over. Having converted to the Episcopal Church years before, he deepened his connection to the Church when he accepted the post of Director of Television and New Media for Trinity Wall Street in lower Manhattan.“I realized my entire professional experience prepared me for my work at Trinity,” he said from his bed at Calvary Hospital in the Bronx on his last Christmas Eve. “I thought I was guided to Trinity.”On the morning of Sept. 11, 2001, Bert Medley was at Trinity Television studios, located in a church building just a few blocks from the World Trade Center. He was preparing to videotape a theological program led by the Right Rev. Dr. Rowan Williams, soon to become the Anglican Archbishop of Canterbury. As the attacks unfolded before their eyes the archbishop led a prayer and Bert went into news producer mode.“The journalist in me just kicked in,” Bert recalled. In fact, one of the freelance videographers Bert hired that day recorded the second plane crashing into the World Trade Center tower.The experiences of the archbishop as he and the clergy and countless employees at Trinity then scrambled to save their own lives and the lives of the nursery school children at Trinity Day Care, would inform his book of theological reflections on 9/11, Writing in the Dust: After September 11.Archbishop Rowan never forgot Bert. Few people who ever met him could. Upon learning of his declining health, he sent a personal note to him with Bishop Herbert Donovan, one of Bert’s close friends and pastor.In the months following 9/11, Mr. Medley’s team at Trinity Television would go on to document the extraordinary 9-month volunteer ministry that was housed at St. Paul’s Chapel, a Trinity-owned church directly across from the Twin Towers. St. Paul’s miraculously survived the collapse of the towers unscathed and became a respite center for first responders. In 2003, it opened one of the first memorial exhibitions in the area.During his five years at Trinity Wall Street, Bert also worked on video projects bringing together renowned international theologians of many faiths to explore the roots of fundamentalist violence and extend the call for non-violent reactions to conflict. Through these projects he came to work both with Nobel Laureate Archbishop Desmond Tutu of Southern Africa and also his successor, Archbishop Njongonkulu Ndungane, with whom he developed a close personal friendship.Bert also became a respected lay leader in the Episcopal Diocese of New York, serving on the vestries of both his own parish, St. Bartholomew’s on Park Avenue, and later at Trinity Wall Street. He also served on the Advisory Board of Episcopal Charities. This did not mean that he forgot his love and respect for the church of his birth. He shared his torn loyalties and recalls being much assuaged by the Rev. Dan Matthews, then rector of Trinity, who reminded Bert that the first client for the Trinity Television production studios he helped revamp was the Seventh-day Adventist program, “Faith for Today.”Bert’s final professional project fulfilled a life-long personal dream.  After leaving Trinity in 2007, he helped a vibrant new start-up channel “K24” in Nairobi, Kenya to develop into a 24-hr. news station. In a rare moment of racial commentary, his friend Alessandra Pena recalls his sharing how unexpectedly overwhelming it was for him to see an entire news station full of young black journalists after an early career being one of a handful of African Americans in any given U.S. newsroom.“I joked that he was having his ‘Roots’ moment,” says Ms. Pena, “and he let out that deep wonderful belly laugh of his and said, ‘Absolutely, and I got to see the dream come true at least once, somewhere!’ ”In October of 2007, while in Kenya, Bert was diagnosed with a recurrence of the spinal astrocytoma he had first battled in 1997. He finally succumbed on March 11 shortly after 11 p.m. surrounded by family and friends, the “framily” who had supported him throughout his final journey.He is survived by his sister Diane and brother-in-law Larry Smith; brother Carlos and sister-in-law Denise Medley; and nieces Bethany Medley Smith, April Jeanene Medley and Deidre Medley Coutsoumpos.A funeral service will be held in April at St. Bartholomew’s Episcopal Church, Park Avenue and 51st Street.  In lieu of flowers, the family invites donations to be made in the name of Bert Medley to “Episcopal Charities of New York” 1047 Amsterdam Avenue, New York, NY  10025 Attn: Rev. Mary Beth Sasso. David Rush says: Rector Hopkinsville, KY Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Belleville, IL Diana Wilcox says: Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME March 21, 2014 at 4:15 pm A wonderful human being. Bert, you will be so very much missed! May light perpetual shine upon him, and may God’s grace and all abiding love embrace all who mourn. Youth Minister Lorton, VA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Submit a Press Release Rector Pittsburgh, PA Suzanne Reifers Judd says: Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Knoxville, TN Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Submit an Event Listing Press Release Service In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Lynn Brewster says: Rector Collierville, TN Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Albany, NY last_img read more