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first_img News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | August 01, 2019 | Jeff Zagoudis, Associate Editor FDA Issues Draft Guidance on Medical Device Safety in MRI Environment The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued a new draft guidance titled Testing and Labeling Medical Devices for… read more Technology | Neuro Imaging | August 07, 2019 Synaptive Medical Launches Modus Plan With Automated Tractography Segmentation Synaptive Medical announced the U.S. launch and availability of Modus Plan featuring BrightMatter AutoSeg. This release… read more News | Stroke | August 16, 2019 Mobile Stroke Unit Gets Patients Quicker Treatment Than Traditional Ambulance Every second counts for stroke patients, as studies show they can lose up to 27 million brain cells per minute…. read more News | Interventional Radiology | July 31, 2019 International Multidisciplinary Group Publishes Recommendations for Personalized HCC Treatment With Y90 TheraSphere New consensus recommendations for personalized treatment for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with BTG’s TheraSphere have… read more News | PET-CT | August 15, 2019 United Imaging Announces First U.S. Clinical Installation of uExplorer Total-body PET/CT United Imaging announced that its uExplorer total-body positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) system… read more News | Neuro Imaging | August 16, 2019 ADHD Medication May Affect Brain Development in Children A drug used to treat attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) appears to affect development of the brain’s… read more January 3, 2013 — A combination of diagnostic tests, including imaging and cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers, can improve prediction of conversion from mild cognitive impairment (MCI) to Alzheimer’s disease, according to a new study published online in December for the journal Radiology.“Because new treatments are likely to be most effective at the earliest stages of Alzheimer’s disease, there is great urgency to develop sensitive markers that facilitate detection and monitoring of early brain changes in individuals at risk,” said Jeffrey R. Petrella, M.D., associate professor of radiology, division of neuroradiology, and director of the Alzheimer’s Disease Research Lab at Duke University Medical Center (DUMC) in Durham, N.C. “Our study looks at whether more sophisticated diagnostic tests such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography (PET) and spinal fluid protein analysis might provide additional prognostic information, compared to more readily available cognitive and blood testing.”According to the World Health Organization, more than 35 million people worldwide are living with Alzheimer’s disease, which is incurable, and the prevalence is expected to double by 2030.“Although there is no cure for Alzheimer’s disease, there are four symptomatic treatments that might provide some benefits,” said co-author P. Murali Doraiswamy, M.D., professor of psychiatry at DUMC. “So developing the right combination of diagnostic tests is critical to make sure we enable an accurate and early diagnosis in patients, so they can evaluate their care options.”The Duke study looked at 97 patients with MCI from the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI), a national multicenter biomarker study in which patients are followed serially to track disease progression. The researchers analyzed baseline MRI and FDG-PET results, as well as cerebrospinal fluid proteins, and compared these to cognitive outcomes at two to three years.The findings showed that combining MRI, FDG-PET and cerebrospinal fluid data with routine clinical tests significantly increased the accuracy of predicting conversion to Alzheimer’s disease over clinical testing alone. In addition, the combined testing reduced false classifications. The misclassification rate decreased from 41.3 percent to 28.4 percent.The researchers also analyzed the individual contributions of the various exams.“In an ideal world, you’d obtain all information available — regardless of cost or number of tests — for the best prediction of cognitive decline,” Petrella said. “However, there’s a trade-off between adding testing — some of which may add little new information — with the inconvenience, cost and risk to the patient.”Among the exams, FDG-PET contributed more information to routine tests than did cerebrospinal fluid or MRI. “Though all the tests added some unique information, FDG-PET appeared to strike the best balance, adding the most prognostic information for patients with mild cognitive impairment,” Petrella said.The researchers caution that additional long-term studies are needed to further validate the data.For more information: www.radiologyinfo.org FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 News | Radiopharmaceuticals and Tracers | July 26, 2019 NorthStar Medical Radioisotopes Awarded $30 Million by U.S. Department of Energy NorthStar Medical Radioisotopes LLC has been awarded $15 million in a cooperative agreement with the U.S. Department of… read more Images of regions of interest (colored lines) in the white matter skeleton representation. Data from left and right anterior thalamic radiation (ATR) were averaged. Image courtesy of C. Bouziane et al. Image courtesy of UTHealth McGovern Medical School News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | August 06, 2019 Canon Medical Introduces Encore Orian MR Upgrade Program Canon Medical Systems USA Inc. is helping to provide low-cost patient care solutions for its customers with the launch… read more Technology | Interventional Radiology | August 16, 2019 Profound Medical Receives U.S. FDA 510(k) Clearance for Tulsa-Pro Profound Medical Corp. announced it has received 510(k) clearance from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to… read more News | Radiopharmaceuticals and Tracers | August 02, 2019 ASRT Supports Radiopharmaceutical Reimbursement Bill The American Society of Radiologic Technologists (ASRT) announced its support for House Resolution (HR) 3772, a measure… read more Related Content News | January 03, 2013 Combination of Imaging Exams Improves Alzheimer’s Diagnosis last_img read more