Sportingbet scores a World Cup boost

first_img Sportingbet scores a World Cup boost More From Our Partners Brave 7-Year-old Boy Swims an Hour to Rescue His Dad and Little Sistergoodnewsnetwork.orgA ProPublica investigation has caused outrage in the U.S. this weekvaluewalk.comAstounding Fossil Discovery in California After Man Looks Closelygoodnewsnetwork.orgKiller drone ‘hunted down a human target’ without being told tonypost.comNative American Tribe Gets Back Sacred Island Taken 160 Years Agogoodnewsnetwork.orgConnecticut man dies after crashing Harley into live bearnypost.comPolice Capture Elusive Tiger Poacher After 20 Years of Pursuing the Huntergoodnewsnetwork.orgFlorida woman allegedly crashes children’s birthday party, rapes teennypost.comRussell Wilson, AOC among many voicing support for Naomi Osakacbsnews.comBiden received funds from top Russia lobbyist before Nord Stream 2 giveawaynypost.comUK teen died on school trip after teachers allegedly refused her pleasnypost.comMatt Gaetz swindled by ‘malicious actors’ in $155K boat sale boondogglenypost.comFeds seized 18 devices from Rudy Giuliani and his employees in April raidnypost.comSupermodel Anne Vyalitsyna claims income drop, pushes for child supportnypost.comMark Eaton, former NBA All-Star, dead at 64nypost.com‘The Love Boat’ captain Gavin MacLeod dies at 90nypost.com980-foot skyscraper sways in China, prompting panic and evacuationsnypost.comI blew off Adam Sandler 22 years ago — and it’s my biggest regretnypost.com KCS-content Share by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeMoneyPailShe Was A Star, Now She Works In ScottsdaleMoneyPailNoteabley25 Funny Notes Written By StrangersNoteableyZen HeraldThe Truth About Why ’40s Actor John Wayne Didn’t Serve In WWII Has Come To LightZen HeraldCrowdy FanShe Didn’t Know Why Everyone Was Staring At Her Hilarious T-ShirtCrowdy FanBetterBe20 Stunning Female AthletesBetterBeautooverload.comDeclassified Vietnam War Photos The Public Wasn’t Meant To Seeautooverload.comAtlantic MirrorA Kilimanjaro Discovery Has Proved This About The BibleAtlantic MirrorTotal PastThe Ingenious Reason There Are No Mosquitoes At Disney WorldTotal PastElite HeraldKate Middleton Dropped An Unexpected Baby BombshellElite Herald Show Comments ▼ INTERNET gambling firm Sportingbet said yesterday it had performed strongly during the World Cup with margins boosted by a number of results going against the favourites during the competition. The company took more than £50m worth of bets during the tournament, of which 65 per cent were made during matches using the company’s “In Play” betting service.“The strong World Cup performance underpins the fourth quarter trading results and the board remains confident that the group will meet management expectations for the financial year just ended,” Sportingbet said.A significant number of low scoring games had also favoured the bookmaker as punters tend to back high-scoring results, the company said. Sportingbet said it had continued to perform in line with management expectations throughout the final quarter of the year. The company moved its shares to the main London Stock Exchange from the Alternative Investment Market (AIM) in May this year after a growth spurt.Chief executive Andrew McIver said: “In line with much of the betting industry, the group enjoyed a strong performance during the FIFA World Cup.” The company will announce full-year results on 6 October. Bwin and PartyGaming have announced a merger while the industry hopes for a relaxation of gaming laws in the US which would help to fuel a profit rise. whatsapp Thursday 12 August 2010 8:26 pm Tags: NULL whatsapplast_img read more

Superwoman Horlick sets up film finance firm

first_imgTuesday 5 October 2010 7:51 pm Tags: NULL Superwoman Horlick sets up film finance firm whatsapp More From Our Partners Native American Tribe Gets Back Sacred Island Taken 160 Years Agogoodnewsnetwork.orgMark Eaton, former NBA All-Star, dead at 64nypost.comBrave 7-Year-old Boy Swims an Hour to Rescue His Dad and Little Sistergoodnewsnetwork.orgA ProPublica investigation has caused outrage in the U.S. this weekvaluewalk.comRussell Wilson, AOC among many voicing support for Naomi Osakacbsnews.comI blew off Adam Sandler 22 years ago — and it’s my biggest regretnypost.comAstounding Fossil Discovery in California After Man Looks Closelygoodnewsnetwork.orgFlorida woman allegedly crashes children’s birthday party, rapes teennypost.comPolice Capture Elusive Tiger Poacher After 20 Years of Pursuing the Huntergoodnewsnetwork.org Share BRAMDEAN Asset Management, the investment company run by the City fund manger once dubbed superwoman, Nicola Horlick, will launch a film development company today.Derby Street Films is seeking £2m from private investors to develop books and potentially television programmes into movies.Horlick said the company planned to develop 25 films over the next three years, either developing a book into a film from the ground up or investing in an existing script, which needed some more money to reach completion.Horlick said many producers were concerned about the lack of development finance available. She added Derby Street Films would provide a safe bet for investors, while providing the finance producers wanted, as it didn’t depend on box office success.She also dispelled any suggestion that she would be financing her husband, journalist Martin Baker’s attempts to turn his book, Meltdown, set at the height of the financial crisis, into a film.She said: “My husband has been working on a script for his book and has been working with a producer in Hollywood but the timing of the launch of the company and that are purely coincidental and we have nothing to do with it.” KCS-content whatsapp Show Comments ▼last_img read more

Polish rates in 17-month freeze

first_img whatsapp Polish rates in 17-month freeze KCS-content More From Our Partners Astounding Fossil Discovery in California After Man Looks Closelygoodnewsnetwork.orgSupermodel Anne Vyalitsyna claims income drop, pushes for child supportnypost.comNative American Tribe Gets Back Sacred Island Taken 160 Years Agogoodnewsnetwork.orgInside Ashton Kutcher and Mila Kunis’ not-so-average farmhouse estatenypost.comPolice Capture Elusive Tiger Poacher After 20 Years of Pursuing the Huntergoodnewsnetwork.orgUK teen died on school trip after teachers allegedly refused her pleasnypost.comRussell Wilson, AOC among many voicing support for Naomi Osakacbsnews.comA ProPublica investigation has caused outrage in the U.S. this weekvaluewalk.comBrave 7-Year-old Boy Swims an Hour to Rescue His Dad and Little Sistergoodnewsnetwork.orgMark Eaton, former NBA All-Star, dead at 64nypost.comMatt Gaetz swindled by ‘malicious actors’ in $155K boat sale boondogglenypost.comFlorida woman allegedly crashes children’s birthday party, rapes teennypost.comI blew off Adam Sandler 22 years ago — and it’s my biggest regretnypost.comBiden received funds from top Russia lobbyist before Nord Stream 2 giveawaynypost.comKiller drone ‘hunted down a human target’ without being told tonypost.comWhy people are finding dryer sheets in their mailboxesnypost.com980-foot skyscraper sways in China, prompting panic and evacuationsnypost.comConnecticut man dies after crashing Harley into live bearnypost.com Tuesday 23 November 2010 8:46 pm Share Show Comments ▼ Poland’s benchmark interest rate was kept unchanged yesterday, for the seventeenth consecutive month, according to the country’s Narodowy Bank Polski. The Monetary Policy Council voted to keep rates at 3.5 per cent, sticking to its “wait and see” policy in spite of inflation remaining at a 34-month low. Tags: NULL whatsapplast_img read more

The house that Denise Coates built

first_img Regions: UK & Ireland AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter The annual mainstream media feeding frenzy sparked by Bet365’s annual results, and its chief executive’s pay, betrays some glaring double standards, and almost suggests there is little to be gained from more transparency, writes Scott Longley. Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter Finance The annual mainstream media feeding frenzy sparked by Bet365’s annual results, and its chief executive’s pay, betrays some glaring double standards, and almost suggests there is little to be gained from greater transparency, writes Scott Longley.Compare two chief executives. One, Jeff Fairburn, was formerly the boss at Persimmon the housebuilder – or as a scathing report into the company’s fire safety procedures put it this week, a house-seller not a housebuilder.Not only did the recently revealed shocking fire safety record happen under Mr Fairburn’s watch; he also received £85m in the two years while this – until now – hidden safety debacle was unfolding.His cash came in the form of salary and bonuses under a controversial long-term incentive plan (LTIP) which, the company revealed in March this year, had paid out £444m to various executives within the firm.All this for being in place at the right time, just as the UK government stoked the embers of the country’s housing market with a whopping industry subsidy misleading called Help to Buy.Now let’s turn to more familiar territory. Also this week we saw headlines loudly proclaiming that Denise Coates had been paid the grand sum of £277m in the year to March plus a further £46m in her share of dividends.At first blush, that looks like what it is – an awful lot of money. But unlike Fairburn, Coates not only runs the company where she earns that wage, she also founded it alongside her family and Will Roseff. Coates hasn’t lucked into her post at an auspicious time. She has spent 20-plus years building the business from that famed carpark portakabin into the global betting and gaming behemoth that Bet365 is today.In its annual results released this week, the company said that net gaming revenue for the year almost topped £3bn, up just under 10% year-on-year while operating profit came in at £767m. It is one of the very few UK businesses to truly crack online, employing over 4,600 staff, the majority of which are based in Stoke-on-Trent.In fact, Bet365 is – or should be – symbolic of how previously industrial economic heartlands in the UK can be refashioned for the 21st Century. It is a (north) west midlands economic powerhouse existing at a time when such entities anywhere in the UK are in short supply.And for all the media’s moral huffiness about a woman – a woman! – making so much money from gambling, it barely gets a mention that unlike the tax-efficient schemes beloved of Fairburn and executive remuneration committees of listed companies, Coates is paying herself a straight wage. In other words, she pays a lot of tax.Full disclosure Now, for the anti-gambling lobby anybody making money out of gambling is not a good thing. But in a country where we accept betting as part and parcel of the fabric of society, there has to be winners and losers and it so happens that the founders of bet365 are among the (very big) winners in this regard.If there is an issue, for the rest of the global gaming industry as much as for the mainstream press, then it lies in where Bet365 makes its money.It isn’t news that Bet365 generates a proportion of its revenues from Asia with China looming large in whatever that number might be. The newspapers have made much of what they see as obfuscation on the company’s part about the geographical spread of its revenues. The paragraph from the annual report stating that “a geographical analysis of turnover has not been given, as in the opinion of the directors, such disclosure would be severely prejudicial to the interests of the group,” got special attention from the Guardian, for instance.The answer to that is quite simple though. As a private company, bet365 does not have a wider shareholder base to answer to and is under no obligation to give any further details about where it makes its money.True, it can be argued there are more stakeholders in Bet365’s future than is generally acknowledged. The 4,600-plus staff, of course, but also the many hundreds – maybe thousands – that work with suppliers to bet365 both within the gambling sector and outside of it. For the sake of some reassurance, they might want to know more about bet365’s fortunes and its likely future trajectory.There also might be an argument for the company to establish a more public face. The fuller explanation of its responsible gambling efforts this year, for instance, was particularly welcome. It helps when it comes to answering the industry’s critics that the major operators are being seen to be doing something.But the Coates family has been understandably shy of publicity and the headlines this week will likely have confirmed the view that there is little to be gained in that direction. The mainstream media gave a sideswipe the gambling trade press for not focusing their coverage on how much money Denise Coates made. Yet it is their focus on that one figure which likely means we learn less about what the company is doing than they might like. Email Address 20th December 2019 | By contenteditor Tags: Mobile Online Gambling Topics: Finance People The house that Denise Coates builtlast_img read more

Masimba Holdings Limited (MSHL.zw) HY2016 Interim Report

first_imgMasimba Holdings Limited (MSHL.zw) listed on the Zimbabwe Stock Exchange under the Building & Associated sector has released it’s 2016 interim results for the half year.For more information about Masimba Holdings Limited (MSHL.zw) reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations, visit the Masimba Holdings Limited (MSHL.zw) company page on AfricanFinancials.Document: Masimba Holdings Limited (MSHL.zw)  2016 interim results for the half year.Company ProfileMasimba Holdings Limited is a well-established company in Zimbabwe providing engineering and infrastructure solutions to the agricultural, commercial and corporate sector as well as housing, mining, public and water sectors. The company has three operation divisions; Masimba Construction Zimbabwe, Proplastics and Property Development. Masimba Construction is responsible for design, development, planning, engineering and construction of commercial buildings, private housing developments and earthwork projects in Zimbabwe, and the fabrication and erection of structural steel. The other subsidiaries offer turnkey engineering solutions to the construction industry, aswell as provide reinforcement steel, steel fixing, wire mesh and cutting and bending products. Masimba Holdings Limited is listed on the Zimbabwe Stock Exchangelast_img read more

Exploring collaborative ministries

first_img Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC By Greg SylerPosted Feb 2, 2012 Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET [Episcopal News Service] I’m excited to be part of a process in the Diocese of Washington focusing on collaboration, looking at Region 6 in our diocese. Locals call the region southern Maryland – 22 parishes in the old tobacco economy of lower Prince George’s, Charles, and St. Mary’s Counties.  All but two of the congregations have graveyards, and many date back to the earliest days of the nation.  But tobacco is no longer a cash crop so farms are snatched up by developers and new homes are quickly built, making it the fastest growing region in the state.  But the churches are losing ground. Average Sunday attendance is 75, and it’s an aging membership.  Southern Maryland is a snapshot of the Episcopal Church in America today.Four years ago, our region started a conversation with our diocese. The point was simple: we need to change the way we do church, or else there won’t be any church left. As smart as we were to see this, we were naïve to think that naming the elephant actually gets it out of the room. Neither the diocese nor the congregations were willing to change the institutional structure, nor was either imaginative or inspired enough by the Holy Spirit to do so.Over time, the idea of collaboration emerged.  “We need to act as one Episcopal Church,” went the rallying cry of a well-attended event one year ago.  And so was born the Collaborative Ministries Exploration Group or CMEG, a voluntary coalition of 25 lay and clergy leaders.The diocese picked up the tab for catering and a consultant, and my co-chair and I determined that CMEG would eat, pray and share our individual stories, then get to work on the nuts-and-bolts of collaboration: research strategies of collaboration and present what we learned.  A great idea.A funny thing happened along the way. We enjoyed praying and sharing our stories, but we barely accomplished half of what we set out to do.  We have done something important, though. We’ve built a new community of people, inspired by the Holy Spirit to imagine what the Body of Christ can be.In so doing, we’ve also realized that collaboration is not enough. At its core, the question of sustainability for the Episcopal Church (and not just in southern Maryland) is really about how God is transforming the residues of conventional Christianity into a robust, mission-minded fellowship who gathers in the name of His Son, Jesus. Without a new community and new vision, collaboration doesn’t sufficiently challenge the (ironically) congregational nature of the way many of us think.It’s easy to say we need to act like one Episcopal Church. It’s a lot harder to do; changing policy is too big and boring.  We can, however, change the way the People of God do church, then expect the institution to change.  Our goal is no longer collaboration but, rather, collaborative ministries.  We’re setting out to develop the discipleship capacity of our membership, and if we want to do impactful work we’ve got to work together with other congregations, creating ministries that do not yet exist or broadening ministries that someone is doing but not with maximum impact.The Episcopal Church’s institutional structure is changing, no matter what, so it seems wise our diocesan leadership is willing to run with the structural changes that will necessarily emerge when the people of God start being church together in new and different ways. It will require new disciplines – it’s probably easier, still, for a diocese to communicate with one parish than with one region – and we’ll undoubtedly have to learn new things.This is where we are as one region in one diocese and, I’d suspect, as the Episcopal Church today.  It’s about collaboration, after all, so we’d like to open the conversation and share our early discoveries:1.    You’ve got to have this conversation regularly, even though it may look to some like you’re not doing anything.2.    Collaboration in ministry is a good idea, regardless of church size.  If you invite people into the conversation, many of them will come to realize this on their own.3.    Collaborative ministry is not the only strategy.  We still need healthy and happy parish churches to provide weekly sustenance.  Not everyone will think collaborative ministry is a great idea, nor should they.4.    Collaborative ministry challenges the singular dominance of the one-parish/one-priest model.  There are other ways of organizing, and people (including dioceses) will come to realize that.5.    Many church-folks are ready to do meaningful ministry.  Equally, they’re tired of talking about decline.  More focus on loss won’t move anyone anywhere.6.    There are smart practitioners in the field of congregational development but what works in one situation won’t necessarily translate everywhere.7.    A lot of our best attempts seek to stem the loss of membership, instead of grow the Church.8.    The challenge of our time is to coordinate collaborative efforts on a large-scale.  This work is often done in limited contexts and, generally, with churches already in decline.  We actually have the human resources now, sitting in our pews.— The Rev. Greg Syler is rector of St. George’s in Valley Lee, Maryland, co-chairs the Collaborative Ministries Exploration Group of Region 6 of the Diocese of Washington and is working with others to create a diocesan summer camp. Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY February 2, 2012 at 6:28 pm What resonates for me is the following point made in this article: “Collaborative ministry is not the only strategy. We still need healthy and happy parish churches to provide weekly sustenance. Not everyone will think collaborative ministry is a great idea, nor should they.” As a 20-year member of an Episcopal parish in Washington, D.C., I would add that even if one thinks that collaborating on one or two big mission projects is a good idea, one still wants and needs a very healthy parish — that is, a Christian family or community — which attracts because it evinces God’s love operating within it, among its members. There are a zillion nonprofits doing social and economic justice missions. One joins and supports a church, I think, to be “fed”, as in “Feed my sheep.” If that is not occurring at the Parish level, a collaborative mission overarching numerous parishes will, I fear, not prevent the church from dwindling. Featured Events TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Bob Partlow says: Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Press Release Service Kurt H. Jacobs says: Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Featured Jobs & Calls Comments are closed. The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Bath, NC Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Submit a Press Release Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Exploring collaborative ministries Comments (3) Rector Albany, NY Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Shreveport, LA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Smithfield, NC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA center_img Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Washington, DC Director of Music Morristown, NJ Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Pittsburgh, PA Submit an Event Listing Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA February 3, 2012 at 10:16 am I think collaboration has great merit under many circumstances. I do have to wonder why the fastest growing area of a state needs that strategy for parishes survival? “Southside” Virginia which has had long term broad economic and population decline is waking up to collaboration as part of a survival strategy. But of greater importance, I believe, is the urgent need to equip and empower greater ministry by all the baptized. The church needs this in all locations and situations. Emerging generations want to effectively participate in their religious practices. New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Belleville, IL Peggy Goldsmith says: Rector Collierville, TN Rector Martinsville, VA February 2, 2012 at 10:33 pm I go to St Paul’s Piney. Did your group discuss the challenges of the physical distances between the parishes in Region 6? Piney hosts a luncheon twice a year for parishioners in the Region who are 50 or older. We have some churches tell us it’s just too far to come. Our next one is scheduled for 5/8 and I’ve been told Bishop Mariann will be coming. In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Associate Rector Columbus, GA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Tampa, FL Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Knoxville, TN An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Submit a Job Listing Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Youth Minister Lorton, VAlast_img read more

Historic Philadelphia church takes new approach to serving the oppressed:…

first_img Rector Belleville, IL This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Comments are closed. December 13, 2017 at 1:44 pm Just to clarify, I meant Church of the Advocate, not Advent. . . Advocacy Peace & Justice Rector Bath, NC Ronald L. Reed says: Submit a Press Release Judy Buck-Glenn says: December 12, 2017 at 10:54 am I am in awe of all that is being done at Advocate. I know Renee McKenzie. She deserves all the accolades and awards she has been given. And it is heartening to read so much good news in a time of such despair, to be reminded that there is always hope. Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR By Amy SowderPosted Dec 11, 2017 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Press Release Service Director of Music Morristown, NJ January 8, 2018 at 12:39 pm More than 70 years ago I served very briefly as substitute organist at Church of the Advocate. I’ve often wondered how it was doing, having left the Philadelphia area long ago. I’m pleased to know that it is alive and serving it’s neighborhoods well. Rector Tampa, FL Rector Smithfield, NC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Historic Philadelphia church takes new approach to serving the oppressed: healing trauma Church of the Advocate’s ministries get boost from grants Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Collierville, TN Featured Jobs & Calls Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Hopkinsville, KY Cathedral Dean Boise, ID TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab December 11, 2017 at 7:55 pm An inspiring article. As a priest and former Rector of Christ Church and St. Michaels’s in the 1970’s and ’80’s, I am so thrilled to read of the on-going effective and successful witness and worship of Church of the Advent, just wonderful. Paul Washington was a friend, colleague and fellow staff member when we worked together in parish ministry and with our Bp Lyman Ogilby. I miss you,Paul. Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Course Director Jerusalem, Israel An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Pittsburgh, PA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Albany, NY Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Associate Rector Columbus, GA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA ed stevens says: Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Tags Submit an Event Listing Curate Diocese of Nebraska The Rev. Renee McKenzie-Hayward takes an impromptu boxing lesson as volunteers prepare to start a youth boxing program to add to the athletic offerings in January at the Advocate Center for Culture and Education, a nonprofit partner ministry of the Church of the Advocate in North Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Photo: Amy Sowder/Episcopal News Service[Episcopal News Service — Philadelphia, Pennsylvania] As the lunch crowd dwindled, three men stood in a huddle and pulled out white boxing gloves. The Rev. Renee McKenzie-Hayward emerged from her office and greeted the men.Soon, the priest was gloved, taking practice jabs and right hooks — and laughing.“Fighting for the life of this community, we want to maintain the African-American rich cultural history. The Advocate is central for that. It’s a hub for that,” McKenzie told Episcopal News Service the day before, as she sat in her office painted in African violet. “People can come here to organize, and I say you come here to get stronger and then go out to work.”You have to be tough, yet warm and welcoming, to do McKenzie’s job at George W. South Memorial Church of the Advocate in North Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. In that northern area, the church sits in the Cecil B. Moore neighborhood, named after the civil rights activist and local NAACP president. The neighborhood is predominately African-American and Puerto Rican residents who grew up here, but the ever-increasing influx of college students from nearby Temple University is changing the landscape. A Temple graduate and the university’s Episcopal chaplain, McKenzie values what the burgeoning college population can offer the community, and she has watched the gentrification change the fabric of the neighborhood.That’s only one battle of many. Since 2011, McKenzie has dug into the struggles of this church with a long-standing reputation of ardent inclusiveness and a mission to fight for the rights of anyone who’s oppressed. In May, McKenzie earned some recognition that will make these goals more possible.The Episcopal Church Foundation awarded McKenzie one of five 2017 fellowships. Established in 1964, the Fellowship Partners program supports emerging scholars and ministry leaders who have a passion for forming the next generation of leaders in the Episcopal Church.It was McKenzie’s proposed Healing Trauma project that earned the financial award of $15,000. She also won a Lilly Endowment Clergy Renewal Grant for $43,005.Since 2011, McKenzie has been the vicar of the Church of the Advocate, a historic congregation known for its efforts for social change, education and the arts in North Philadelphia. Photo: Amy Sowder/Episcopal News ServiceDonald Romanik, ECF president, said he appreciated how McKenzie’s trauma-informed ministry will be all about developing an understanding of congregational life through the lens of trauma.“We knew the Rev. Dr. Renee McKenzie would make an excellent ECF fellow for her important work on trauma-informed ministry, social justice and uplifting and growing leaders from African-American communities, both in her church and as a model for our church at large,” Romanik said.Although she’s in the research and planning stage, McKenzie envisions a healing trauma center in which people first meet with a social worker to assess their needs. They might first participate in programs for basic survival, such as food and shelter. Then, they can join programs that fulfill higher needs, such as education, financial betterment, arts enrichment and cultural-political empowerment.“How can we use the resources that the Advocate already has in place? How can we bring those all together under one umbrella so that we work in a common direction?” McKenzie asked. “People need physical, spiritual, mental and social healing. Asking how we bring that together, that’s basically how the Healing Trauma project began.”What is this kind of trauma?In trauma-informed work, there’s individual trauma, such as a person’s experience and the lingering effects of rape, abuse and war.“But in our community, it’s also about systemic trauma,” McKenzie said. “That’s where the white supremacy piece comes in. That’s where the justice piece comes in for us. Racial inequality. Poverty.”For Barbara Easley-Cox, decent housing is where she wants to focus on systematic trauma healing. She’s fought for this cause as a Black Panther since the 1970s and was helped into housing herself across the street from the Advocate through the efforts of the Rev. Paul Washington, the church’s legendary priest who served from 1962 to 1987.“It’s not only a black-white thing,” Easley-Cox said. “It’s all oppression of any color, shape and size. For me, I always want to bring things to a more worldly view. Yeah, the Holocaust was bad for Jews; slavery was bad for us. But what makes you think it’s over?”These days, Easley-Cox volunteers at the church doing whatever is needed, from sorting clothing donations to cooking savory dishes for coffee hour.“I come to service every Sunday because I like Rev. Renee’s sermons,” Easley-Cox said. “She gives you the gospel and translates it to modern day and political issues.”In a November sermon, McKenzie addressed the #MeToo movement against sexual harassment, sharing some of her own experiences. It’s yet another type of systematic trauma that needs healing.“It’s not just women versus men,” McKenzie said. “It’s so many people who have a story of someone who had the capacity to overpower them because of their privilege.”The Healing Trauma project would work in three phases: developing awareness, unpacking trauma, and rejuvenating and empowering.“You cannot address the problem until you can name the problem,” McKenzie said. “First, we want to help people to name it and then to understand it. And then to become resilient against it.”The Advocate’s storied historyThe Church of the Advocate, aptly named, has been fighting for the rights of all people, especially those systematically oppressed, since it was consecrated in 1897.It’s a landmark in the religious, social and architectural history of the Unites States. Built as a memorial to civic leader and merchant George W. South, the sprawling complex includes a chapel, parish house, curacy and rectory designed in the French Gothic Revival style by renowned church architect Charles Burns.Historically significant church-related, political and cultural events have occurred at North Philadelphia’s Church of the Advocate, which is built in a French Gothic architectural style, all of which lend to its status as a National Historic Landmark. Photo: Amy Sowder/Episcopal News ServiceThe Advocate was selected as a National Historic Landmark in 1996 and has been listed on the National Register of Historic Places since 1980.The church was built in this grand scale specifically for the working class. The founders ruled that no pews could be rented so everyone could afford a seat. In fact, they didn’t even use pews back then, and they don’t now. Lightly cushioned chairs line the nave.The Rev. Paul Washington commissioned artists Walter Edmonds and Richard Watson to create 14 murals. Under each are written descriptions drawing parallels between the African-American and ancient Hebrew experiences. There are no pews in the nave, a practice born from the church founders’ desire to abolish pew rentals and make attendance accessible to all people. Photo: Amy Sowder/Episcopal News ServiceThe church has been key in the civil rights movement and the struggle for women’s rights. The Advocate hosted the National Conference of Black Power in 1968 and the Black Panther Conference in 1970. In 1974, 11 female deacons were ordained as priests at the church. Those ordinations pushed the then-ongoing debate about women in the priesthood to a new level and led, slightly more than two years later, to the General Convention explicitly allowing women to become priests and bishops.The Advocate’s sanctuary has another bold, distinguishing feature: the murals.From 1973 to 1976, artists Walter Edmonds and Richard Watson painted 14 stunning murals that depict the African-American experience. Valerie Anderson, a volunteer docent, leads educational tours of the murals. It’s one of the programs McKenzie started three years ago to preserve the community’s culture and history.Below each painting is a Bible verse and corresponding message, drawing on the parallels of Hebrews and African Americans. The paintings take the viewer from slavery and emancipation to civil rights and black power, Anderson said as she gave a tour.Some murals convey the grief and loss with esoteric designs and swirls of blues. Others, which include a couple controversial images, depict the anger and rebellion of the oppressed in fiery reds and oranges.In the nave of the Church of the Advocate, Valerie Anderson, a volunteer docent, leads educational tours of the 14 murals depicting the African-American experience, history and culture. Photo: Amy Sowder/Episcopal News Service“I always try to bring it forward to where we are today. It really encourages dialogue,” Anderson said about her tours. She spoke about the danger of internalizing the oppressor, which is when you start to believe the hurtful words said about you, and your behavior changes to reflect that negative message.“We’ve got to erase that tape,” Anderson said.Advocate CaféMarvin C., 40, who asked not to use his full name, used to teach at an Episcopal nursery school before he fell into a lifestyle that led him down the wrong road and eventually left him homeless. Then he found the free weekday lunches at the Advocate Café, a church ministry for 34 years. One day, he stayed to watch a documentary. McKenzie noticed him.“I saw the spark in him, you know?” she said. The vicar immediately persuaded Marvin to teach an adult literacy class and participate in the after-school program.Now, three months later, Marvin has a catering job while he pursues preschool positions and attends support groups. He’s interviewing at the Advocate Center for Culture and Education to teach wellness classes like calisthenics. Marvin has a home. When he visits the café now, it’s to help others.“It’s a great purpose to work with the young and old,” Marvin said. “I was really meant to teach. This is a platform, regardless of how I walked in here homeless and just to eat.”When McKenzie arrived at the Advocate six years ago, the café served about 60 to 70 hot meals a day, five days a week. Now that daily crowd is at 100 to 120.On this December day, Elsie Vives dove her fork into her salad, concentrating on the day’s lunch of spaghetti in meaty marinara sauce, yam-pineapple casserole, green salad and a clementine.“I like the way they do the food. They’ve got good food every time. In fact, I come here every day,” said Vives, who walks almost 2½ miles to reach the café.Elsie Vives enjoys the hot meals, such as this pasta with meaty marinara sauce, yam casserole and green salad, five days a week at the Advocate Cafe at the Church of the Advocate in North Philadelphia. The ministry feeds about 100 people a day. Photo: Amy Sowder/Episcopal News ServiceLike many church feeding programs, the café offers so much more than food. More than 5,400 social services requests were fulfilled in 2016. Those services include clothing donations; ID procurement; referrals for jobs, housing and health care; access to resources such as computers, printers and phones; occasional musical entertainment and education workshops during the noon to 2 p.m. mealtime; and professional visits from Temple University nursing students and other experts.Willie Mae Williams has been with the café, in one way or another, for nine years. “I used to come here to eat, and one day, I asked if I could help out, and I’ve been here ever since,” said Williams as she organized the clothing donations. “It keeps me busy. Why stay home and go crazy when I can come here and help out?”Willie Mae Williams was a patron of the Advocate Cafe, and now she volunteers at the noon to 2 p.m. mealtime, helping sort clothing donations and perform other duties. Photo: Amy Sowder/Episcopal News ServiceDuring a recent lunchtime, Ta Abdullah held a Dunkin’ Donuts job application as he chatted with others hanging out at the café. He appreciates how staff and volunteers help patrons with their job hunt and offer the use of a phone for work purposes.“You’ve got people coming here from all walks of life,” Abdullah said. “It’s like a gathering. It’s a blessing to some people.”Advocate Center for Culture and EducationThe cultural program began about three years ago for youth in grades 3 to 12, after school and in the summer. It’s housed next door in a three-story former row home, where Adia Harmon, executive director, presides in the first-floor lobby as children pour in four days a week.There’s a dizzying number of activities, and it’s growing. In 2016, the program served about 600 children.“I am here solely out of passion,” said Harmon, a Philadelphia native who loves to witness the direct impact these programs have on a child’s life. “I can see it. The blessings come from when you serve people.”The sports division started with age-grouped basketball teams that play in the prized gym built in 2004. Marvin plans to lead calisthenics as part of a wellness program that also includes drum circles and meditation, and in January, the new boxing program.“Research on testosterone points to kids who showed less aggression in school and at home after a program like this, because they had an outlet to release that energy and frustration,” said Johnny Malin, an intern through the Servant Year program in the Episcopal Diocese of Pennsylvania.This segment of the Philadelphia-based Mighty Writers program for youth ages 7 to 17 operates on the second floor of the Advocate Center for Culture and Education and is divided into a program for high schoolers and one for middle schoolers. Here, the younger group learns to think and write with clarity so they can achieve success at school, at work and in life. Photo: Amy Sowder/Episcopal News ServiceOn the second floor, the Mighty Writers program was underway, taught by James Owk. Recent sessions have started with a chapter of the “Black Privilege: Opportunity Comes to Those Who Create It” audiobook by Charlamagne Tha God, followed by writing a paragraph each on three questions and then a discussion.“I’m not really a people person, and I feel like this program puts me out there to make friends, and it’s something new every day,” said Tori-Ann Kent, a teen student. “It really opens you up to what’s going on in the world.”On the third floor, teaching artist Scott Bickmore led a class of younger children in an acrylic painting project with an heirloom theme, tying together still-life paintings of salsa ingredients, based on a family recipe. The kids will eat homemade salsa at the project’s end.“Here’s my tomato painting,” said Jasiya Smith, 10, as she held up her art. “I also did a lime, a garlic, cilantro.” She tasted cilantro for the first time and thought it was “OK.”Jasiya Smith, 10, painted tomatoes as part of her after-school art class with teaching artist Scott Bickmore at the Advocate Center. Photo: Amy Sowder/Episcopal News ServiceThere’s homework help and tutoring, college preparation, a drama and dance program that uses the stage next door at the church, and gardening out back when the weather allows.“I’m trying to get these guys to be more plant-based, trying to tie it in with our community garden,” Bickmore said about his art class.Community spaceThe church’s greatest asset and liability is the building, McKenzie said. The maintenance of such a majestic, historic building is a never-ending expense, but those same qualities also draw people inside. She wants room rentals to enable the building to pay for itself. From the outside, it seems like there are enough community activities to fulfill that goal already.Easley-Cox, the church volunteer, neighbor and former Black Panther, has always enjoyed the church’s cultural festivals and political events. She reveled in the John Coltrane jazz festival, which was a recurring event for a while, and a Rainbow Coalition concert, as well as the opportunities to dig into Mamie’s fried chicken, made by the longtime church cook.“The church is an umbrella that everybody stands under,” Easley-Cox said. “And it works.”The Advocate has three resident arts groups: Kaleidoscope Theater hosts four drama performances a year, the August Wilson consortium puts on play readings, and the Prometheus Chamber Orchestra performs four to six concerts a year.Veronica Jurkiewicz is a violinist and co-founder of the 14-member orchestra, an Advocate resident since 2013. The orchestra has no conductor.“Our model is based on democracy and individual responsibility,” Jurkiewicz said. “We really try to be a part of the social change movement. There’s really a long history of social justice and art and activism here, and we want to be a part of that.”The orchestra plays at the John Coltrane festival, memorial services, weddings and the Advocate Café when rehearsing for a performance. In 2016, they collaborated with an ensemble of Arabic musicians called Al-Bustan Takht. And in June, the musicians are excited to perform and premier a piece with Grammy-nominated choir The Crossing.Divya Nair, a doctoral student in literature who’s working with McKenzie on the Healing Trauma project, first stepped into the church two years ago, to attend Saturday Free School, a philosophy reading group that organizes conferences and symposiums.“My first time here, with the beautiful architecture and spirituality, I felt this real sense of deep peace,” Nair said. “It’s really exciting to see where this is going to go.”Meanwhile, the community keeps coming inside. The doors are open.Activist Gabriel Bryant organized an event, “Have Black Lives Ever Mattered?” on Dec. 8, comprising a series of panel discussions on mass incarceration, immigration and white supremacy.The Church of the Advocate has “always been super-welcoming to our efforts to gather community,” Bryant said. “This has always been a safe space.”Nair loves the rich musical legacy of the Paul Washington years, when the rector hosted musical giants of the 20th century such as jazz trumpeter Lee Morgan, tenor saxophonist Archie Shepp and Coltrane. The night before his last performance in Philadelphia, Coltrane played in the Advocate’s church courtyard.“A lot of black artists played here because they had nowhere else to go. It’s a pivotal institution,” McKenzie said. “We can’t just let that history go away. We have to continue to fight.”— Amy Sowder is a special correspondent for the Episcopal News Service and a freelance writer and editor based in Brooklyn. She can be reached at [email protected] previous version of this story reported that the female deacons ordained as priests at the Church of the Advocate in 1974 were the first in the Anglican Communion. In fact, Florence Li Tim-Oi became the first female deacon ordained priest in the Anglican Communion in Hong Kong in 1944. Because of controversy surrounding her ordination, she stopped exercising her ministry in 1946 and did not resume it until 1979. Two more female deacons were ordained in Hong Kong in 1971. Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Featured Events AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Youth Minister Lorton, VA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Submit a Job Listing Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Comments (4) Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Shreveport, LA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Ronald Reed says: Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Martinsville, VA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LAlast_img read more

Big opens cultural grants fund in Northern Ireland

About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. Howard Lake | 13 September 2012 | News Big opens cultural grants fund in Northern Ireland  29 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis The Big Lottery Fund in Northern Ireland has opened a small grants programme, ‘Culture for All’, which will provide grants for community-based arts programmes.Delivered and funded by the Big Lottery Fund and the Arts Council of Northern Ireland in partnership with Culture Company 2013, the main aim of the programme is to bring people together to enjoy a range of community-based arts and culture activities that link to UK City of Culture 2013 and improve individual and community well-being and quality of life.In 2013 Derry will be the UK City of Culture 2013 and this funding programme will provide opportunities for communities across Northern Ireland to engage with and share in these celebrations.Culture for All is open to voluntary and statutory organisations who want to run an arts project that links to the UK City of Culture. Other criteria include:· Encouraging talent, increasing skills and strengthening community activity by supporting activities that help to develop people and organisations.· improving quality of life by increasing opportunities for people to engage with UK City of Culture 2013, especially those most disadvantaged to engage with the UK City of Culture celebrations,· meeting local need and have the most impact on communitiesGrants can be up to £10,000 and applications will be accepted up to August 2013.www.biglotteryfund.org.uk AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Tagged with: Funding Ireland Northern Ireland read more

NPC publishes refugee and asylum charity funding guide

first_img  202 total views,  2 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis15 Advertisement NPC has published a guide for donors interested in funding refugee and asylum charities, called Solutions for Sanctuary: An overview of the refugee and asylum charity sector in the UK.The paper provides key contextual information about the scale of the refugee crisis, with profiles of some of the charities and funders operating in this area, and an overview of the different levels at which funders can work, along with key questions for potential funders to consider.Contents also include a guide to the structure of the sector, information on existing funding, and on opportunities for funding, such as how to support individuals, communities and vulnerable groups, as well as Refugee Community Organisations (RCOs), supporting legal aid to help asylum seekers navigate the asylum process, and funding work on campaigning and shaping policy.The guide is available to download from the NPC site at: www.thinknpc.org/publications/solutions-for-sanctuary-refugee-and-asylum-sector/  201 total views,  1 views today NPC publishes refugee and asylum charity funding guide Tagged with: disaster Funding refugeescenter_img Melanie May | 7 July 2016 | News AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis15 About Melanie May Melanie May is a journalist and copywriter specialising in writing both for and about the charity and marketing services sectors since 2001. She can be reached via www.thepurplepim.com.last_img read more

Dissident who was jailed on Yahoo’s information gets early release

first_img RSF_en Help by sharing this information June 2, 2021 Find out more China’s Cyber ​​Censorship Figures Democracies need “reciprocity mechanism” to combat propaganda by authoritarian regimes China: Political commentator sentenced to eight months in prison to go further Receive email alerts ChinaAsia – Pacific April 27, 2021 Find out more Newscenter_img News Organisation News Follow the news on China News ChinaAsia – Pacific Reporters Without Borders hails the early release of Shi Tao, a poet and journalist who was jailed on information provided by the US Internet company Yahoo. Shi was released 15 months ahead of schedule on 7 September.The reason for his early release is not yet known but the South China Morning Post (南华早报) said his good conduct in prison had played a key role.“We welcome this journalist’s release and we urge the authorities to now let him lead a normal life by sparing him the surveillance and intimidation to which many other dissidents have been subjected after their release from prison,” Reporters Without Borders said.“We point out that the situation of news providers continues to be very disturbing and that many dissident journalists, including the 2010 Nobel peace laureate Liu Xiaobo, continue to be jailed because of their activities. “As long as the Communist Party maintains its policies of repression and censorship, we will continue to denounce the Chinese and foreign companies that are complicit in its Internet surveillance. By helping the authorities to identify Shi as the source of a leak of sensitive information, Yahoo! Hong Kong helped to jail this journalist.”It was Reporters Without Borders that discovered and revealed Yahoo!’s role on 6 September 2005. In November 2007, Reporters Without Borders helped Shi’s mother, Gao Qinshen, to travel to the United State to attend a congressional hearing at which Yahoo! was questioned about its role.In its latest transparency report, Yahoo! said it had received 29,000 government requests for information about its users since the start of 2013. The company’s lawyer said Yahoo! took client confidentiality very seriously and that its legal department insisted that government requests were submitted legally and for lawful purposes.Reporters Without Borders believes that it is extremely important that private sector companies should act in a morally and socially responsible way and should protect the confidentiality of news providers’ communications.In a special report released on World Day Against Cyber-Censorship last March, Reporters Without Borders condemned the complicity of certain companies in the development of electronic surveillance networks by authoritarian regimes.Shi was arrested in November 2004 after providing a Chinese dissident forum based outside the country with a copy of an email that the authorities had sent to national news media warning them not to refer to any commemoration of the 1989 Tiananmen Square massacre. It was thanks to information provided by Yahoo! that the authorities were able to identify Shi as the culprit. When tried and sentenced to 10 years in prison in April 2005 on a charge of divulging state secrets, Shi admitted to forwarding the email but disputed that it constituted a state secret. In its defence, Yahoo! said it had no choice but to comply with Chinese legislation and that the relevant operational decisions were taken by Alibaba, a Chinese company that had taken over management of Yahoo!’s services in China.Yahoo! has abandoned most of its activities in China in recent months, first closing its email service and then its news portal. Nowadays, most Chinese citizens use email services provided by Chinese companies.Shi was one of a total of four journalists and cyber-dissidents to be jailed as a result of information that Yahoo! provided to the Chinese authorities, and is the last to be released.The others were Wang Xiaoning, released in August 2012 after ten years in prison; Li Zhi, released in 2011 after serving an eight-year jail term; and Jiang Lijun, released in 2006 after four years in detention.China is ranked 173rd out of 179 countries in the 2013 Reporters Without Borders press freedom index. It is also on the Reporters Without Borders list of “Enemies of the Internet.” September 10, 2013 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Dissident who was jailed on Yahoo’s information gets early release March 12, 2021 Find out morelast_img read more